Course Descriptions

Department of Engineering Technology
and Industrial Distribution

Professors W. W. Buchanan (Head), D. F. Jennings, F. B. Lawrence, V. J. Leon, J. A. Morgan, J. R. Porter, B. Zoghi; Associate Professors J. L. Fike, R. J. Fink, S. Hsieh, N. P. Hung, A. H. Price, J. Wang; Assistant Professors J. A. Alvarado, R. A. Beasley, I. Capar, A. Fang, A. E. Goulart, R. E. Groom, M. D. Johnson, A. Narayanan, M. Natarajarthinam, B. P. Nepal, W. J. Sawaya, M. Vanajakumari, W. Zhan; Senior Lecturers N. L. Clark, M. M. Whiteacre, G. B. Wright; Lecturers J. Dorribo-Camba, M. R. Golla, R. Hutchinson, J. Johnson, R. Lorenzo, L. McDaniels, J. Otey, T. E. Raborn, Y. Ren, L. P. Till

Engineering Technology
(ENTC)

120. Introduction to Quality Assurance. (1-0). Credit 1. II

Importance of quality to the competitiveness of service and manufacturing businesses; Deming’s management philosophies; teamworking; basic techniques for problem solving; process diagnosing and improvement; process variability.

181. Manufacturing and Assembly Processes I. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II, S

A survey of metal manufacturing processes; traditional machining, non-traditional machining, welding, fabrication, casting and assembly. Prerequisite: ENDG 105 or ENGR 111 or registration therein.

200. Introduction to Manufacturing Processes. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II

Overview of basic metallic manufacturing processes: machining, welding, fabricating and computer-aided manufacturing; current technology and economic comparisons. Prerequisite: ENDG 105 or ENGR 111 or registration therein.

206. Nonmetallic Materials. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II

Introduction to structure, properties, processing and application of forest products, plastics, ceramics and composites; laboratory includes processing, physical and mechanical testing, applications, surface treatment and material identification. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 107.

207. Metallic Materials. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II

Introduction to structure, properties and engineering application of ferrous and nonferrous materials; beneficiation, production of ferrous and nonferrous metals, destructive and nondestructive testing, protective coatings, strengthening and heat treatment; laboratory includes metallographic procedures, mechanical testing, heat treatment, surface treatment, corrosion testing, recrystallization and failure analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 107.

210. Circuit Analysis I. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II, S

Electric and magnetic principles of components used in DC circuits; transient analysis; Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, mesh and nodal equations; measurement of current, voltage and waveforms with meters and oscilloscopes. Prerequisite: MATH 151.

211. Circuit Analysis II. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II, S

Continuation of ENTC 210. Multiloop and multinode circuit networks; phasor analysis of networks, resonance, bridge circuits, Fourier components of waveforms, passive filter networks, frequency response, Laplace transformation, practice in measurements. Prerequisites: ENTC 210; MATH 152.

215. Introduction to Telecommunications. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Survey of the telephone industry; analysis of modulations and multiplexing (FDM, TDM); introduction to transmission media (cable pairs, radio, satellites and fiber optics) and to switching (multistage, space and time division). Overview of the major services offered by several common carriers. Prerequisite: PHYS 208 for ENTC majors or PHYS 202 for non-majors.

216. Semiconductor Process Technology. (3-0). Credit 3.

Basic principles and techniques involved in semiconductor manufacturing; process descriptions; terminology; equipment requirements; process controls; basic semiconductor physics and process chemistry combined with control schemes to arrive at overall systems descriptions. Field trips may be required for which departmental fees may be assessed Prerequisites: CHEM 107; PHYS 201 or 218.

219. Digital Electronics. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II, S

Survey of digital applications, number systems, digital logic devices and circuits, sequential logic.

249. Advanced Digital Electronics. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Sequential logic analysis and basic design; computer-based design and simulation of discrete implementation of digital logic using MSI, programmable logic and field programmable gate array devices. Prerequisite: ENTC 219.

250. Introduction to Electronics Technology. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II

Hardware and software tools used in the electronics industry; software tools include LabVIEW and PSPICE; designed for anyone who needs knowledge, awareness and working familiarity of the software tools used in industry.

275. Mechanics for Technologists. (4-0). Credit 4. I, II

Forces, moments and couples in 2-D and 3-D systems; equilibrium of rigid bodies; friction and applications; centroids and moments of inertia; review of particle dynamic principles; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies; principles of impulse-momentum and work-energy; computer use in selected areas. Prerequisites: MATH 152; PHYS 218.

281. Manufacturing and Assembly Processes II. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II

Continuation of ENTC 181. Economics and manufacturability in polymer molding processes; assembly (fits and tolerances); compatibility of metallic and non-metallic discrete parts. Prerequisites: ENTC 181 and 206.

289. Special Topics in… Credit 1 to 4. I, II, S

Selected topics in an identified area of engineering technology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

303. Fluid Mechanics and Power. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Fluid mechanics and fluid power applications for technologists; fluid properties; conservation of energy and momentum; incompressible flow in pipes; standard symbols: components and control of hydraulic systems and pneumatic systems. Prerequisites: ENTC 275; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

313. Industrial Welding Processes. (2-3). Credit 3. II

Theory and practical applications of industrial welding and cutting processes; experience in operation of various machines and processes. Prerequisites: ENTC 181 and 207; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

315. Local-and-Metropolitan-Area Networks. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Design, operation, application and management of LANs and MANs; topologies, cabling systems, protocols, bridges, routers, hubs, switches, security; media and transport systems; Internet and TCP/CP topics including the protocol stack, router operation and addressing issues. Prerequisites: ENTC 215; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

320. Quality Assurance. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II, S

Applied statistical process control and design-of-experiment techniques for quality improvement and process characterization; emphasis on organizations operating in a continuous-improvement, customer-driven environment; statistical thinking; control charts; capability analysis of product, process and measurement system; experimental process characterization, prediction models and input variable control. Prerequisites: STAT 211; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

325. Telecommunications Services Analysis. (3-0). Credit 3. I

Survey of topics dealing with: the telephone network from a regulatory point of view; reduction of telecommunication costs; WATS, FX and PL lines; common carriers; PABX evaluations, operation and management; interconnect and by-pass; telex and related networks; introduction to traffic theory. Prerequisites: ENTC 215; STAT 211; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

345. Telecommunications Testing Techniques. (3-2). Credit 4. I

Testing techniques used in public and private telephone networks: attenuation and level measurements; linear distortions; bit error rates and related topics; fiber optic principles, link design and testing; testing copper cables. Prerequisites: ENTC 315; CSCE 206; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

349. Microprocessors. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Microprocessors including types of circuits and how they function; architecture of microprocessors; instruction sets and how they are programmed. Prerequisites: ENTC 249; CSCE 206; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

350. Electronic Devices and Circuits. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Semiconductor diodes, bipolar junction transistors, junction field effect transistors, operational amplifiers; diode applications, transistor biasing, transistor DC and AC models, operational amplifier theory; various transistor amplifiers in cascade and cascode configurations and operational amplifier applications. Prerequisites: ENTC 211; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

351. Electronic Devices and Circuits II. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Analysis and design using integrated circuits; typical industrial applications of operational amplifiers, Norton amplifiers, 3-terminal regulators, waveform generators and active filters. Prerequisite: ENTC 350.

352. Introduction to Mixed-Signal Test and Measurement. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Testing of mixed-signal circuits for signal processing and interfacing between the circuit under test and state-of-the-art test equipment; concepts include test specifications, parametric testing, measurement accuracy, test hardware, DSP-based testing, analog and sampled channel testing, and focused calibrations. Prerequisites: ENTC 350; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

355. Electromagnetics and High Frequency Systems. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

High frequency concepts including topics in basic electromagnetics, transmission lines, antennas, and RF circuit design; applications including wireless communication systems, fiber optic systems, and high frequency PCB layout. Prerequisites: ENTC 211; PHYS 208; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

359. Electronic Systems Interfacing. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Computer-based data acquisition and process control using graphical development environment; interfacing techniques include digital input/output, analog input/output, counter/timer applications, common transducers/signal conditioning and data communication methods. Prerequisites: ENTC 349 and 350; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

361. Solids Modeling and Analysis. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II

Fundamentals of part geometry development and mechanical assembly; simple finite element analysis used to evaluate and optimize design; rapid prototyping of simple product models. Prerequisite: ENTC 181; ENTC 206; ENTC 207; ENTC 275; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

363. Mechanical Design Applications I. (3-0). Credit 3. I, II

Principles of design of mechanical components; theories of failure; Soderberg and Goodman diagrams; fatigue and fracture design criteria; materials and their selection to engineering applications; component assembly aspects; design of fasteners and springs as examples. Prerequisites: ENTC 376; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

369. Software Systems Technology. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Technical aspects of digital computer software systems, with emphasis on embedded real-time systems, programming techniques and development methodologies. Prerequisites: ENTC 349; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

370. Thermodynamics for Technologists. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II, S

Thermal and mechanical energy transformations; relationships applied to flow and non-flow processes in power and refrigeration cycles; devices include compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, nozzles, diffusers, pumps and piston-cylinder models; computer modeling. Prerequisites: PHYS 218; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

373. Power Technology. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II, S

Primary power sources and mechanical power transmission methods; experimental application of the related theory. Prerequisites: IDIS 300; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

376. Strength of Materials. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Stress and strain; elastic moduli Poisson’s ratio; torsion, bending, unsymmetrical bending; design of beams and shafts; deflection of beams; buckling of columns; material and strength characterization laboratory tests. Prerequisites: ENTC 207 and 275; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

377. Applied Vibration for Technologists. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II

Elements of mechanical vibrations for engineering technologists; undamped, damped, free and forced vibration of single degree freedom systems, multi-degree of freedom systems; vibration absorbers; vibration testing methods and measurement; transient motion and computer analysis of vibrations. Prerequisites: ENTC 376 and 395; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

380. Computer-Aided Manufacturing. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II, S

Basic concepts in computer-aided manufacturing with emphasis on a system approach to manufacturing activities; use of numerical control machine tools and other computer based software as applied to different industries. Prerequisites: ENTC 181; MATH 151; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

383. Manufacturing Information Systems. (3-3). Credit 4. I, II

Use of information technology for manufacturing enterprise applications, including computer-integrated manufacturing, database, computer networking, web-technology and enterprise resource planning. Prerequisites: ENTC 380; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

395. Electro-Mechanical Systems for Technologists. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Model development and analysis; simulation and experimentation of physical open and closed loop systems; integration of graphical user interface and math-analysis software to study dynamic characteristics of simple industry-type systems. Prerequisites: PHYS 208; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

402. Inspection Methods and Procedures. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II

Methods and procedures in nondestructive inspection of materials and industrial products; ultrasonics, dye penetrants, magnetic particle, radiography and supportive evaluation methods such as weld sectioning, polishing, etching and macroscopic analysis. Prerequisites: ENTC 281 and 376; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

403. Fluid Power Technology. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II, S

Design and characteristics of fluid power systems and their adaptation to specific industrial problems of manufacture and consumer equipment. Prerequisites: ENTC 373 or approval of instructor; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

405. Weldability of Ferrous Metals. (3-0). Credit 3. I

Applied principles of metallurgy with reference to weldability of ferrous metals. Prerequisites: ENTC 207 or MEEN 340; ENTC 313 or approval of instructor; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

407. Instrumentation and Controls. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II

Study of measurements; collection and use of real-time data; use of instrumentation, sensors, data acquisition equipment, programmable controllers; errors in measurements; signal processing and process control. Prerequisites: ENTC 219; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

410. Manufacturing Automation and Robotics. (2-3). Credit 3. I, II

Hardware for automated work handling, conveyors, loaders, robots, storage devices; power sources and methods of control, electric motors, controllers, program logic controllers, robot programming; interfacing of equipment controls; and manufacturing work cells. Prerequisites: ENTC 361; ENTC 380; ENTC 383; IDIS 300; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

411. Fixtures and Tooling Systems. (2-2). Credit 3.

Principles of fixturing of workpieces in manufacturing processes; various types of fixturing systems employed in industry and their applications; machining tooling systems employed in industry and their application principles. Prerequisites: ENTC 181; ENTC 380 or ENDG 407; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

412. Production and Inventory Planning. (2-2). Credit 3. I, II

An introductory treatment of models and techniques for the planning of production and inventory systems. Prerequisites: ISEN 302; completion of junior-level courses; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

414. Micro/Nano Manufacturing. (2-3). Credit 3. I

Product miniaturization and impact; review of atomic structure, electrical and physical properties of materials; ultraprecision machining; microlithography; dry and wet etching/sputtering techniques; isotropic and anisotropic processes; pattern transfer with additive processes; surface micromachining; microreplication processes; introduction to packaging technology and nanometrology; manufacturing of selected microsystems (MEMS) and their applications. Prerequisites: CHEM 107; PHYS 208; senior or graduate in engineering or science; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology for ENTC majors.

415. Digital Transmission and Switching. (3-2). Credit 4. I

Digital transmission and switching techniques used in telephone networks: A/D conversion; PAM, PCM, ADPCM, CVSD, LPC, vocoders; pulse transmission; line codes; TDM; DS1; and DS3 signals; digital switching; T, S, TSST; network synchronization; SONET; frame relay; ISDN; VoIP; ATM. Prerequisites: ENTC 215; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

419. Technical Project Management. (3-0). Credit 3. I, II

Fundamentals of technical project management and associated topics; planning and approval activities necessary to prepare a formal technical proposal including scope, time, cost, quality, and risk for following semester’s technical design project. Prerequisites: Senior classification; approval of instructor; must be taken semester immediately preceding ENTC 420; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

420. Engineering Technology Projects. (2-4). Credit 3. I, II

Team approach to analysis and design of basic industrial-level projects; use of standard components and proven design techniques. Prerequisites: ENTC 419; must be taken semester of graduation or by approval of instructor; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

421. Mechanical Technology Projects. (1-3). Credit 2. I, II

Team approach to analysis and design of basic industrial-level projects; integration of concepts learned in previous required courses; capstone learning experience. Prerequisites: ENTC 429; completion of junior-level courses; must be taken semester of graduation; and approval of instructor; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

422. Manufacturing Technology Projects. (1-3). Credit 2. I, II

A capstone projects course utilizing a team approach to an analysis and solutions of manufacturing problems. Prerequisites: ENTC 429; completion of junior-level courses; must be taken semester of graduation; approval of instructor; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

429. Managing People and Projects in a Technological Society. (3-0). Credit 3. I, II

Supervisory and project management duties and responsibilities in technology based organizations and the methods required to fulfill these functions. Prerequisites: ISEN 302 or approval of instructor; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

435. Data Communications. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Data communications concepts, theory and techniques including: transmission, encoding, decoding, error detection and correction, link control, networking and standards. Prerequisites: ENTC 315 and 369; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

452. Advanced Semiconductor Test and Measurement. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Advanced test methodologies; emphasis on DAC testing, ADC testing, Device Interface Board Design, Data Analysis and Test Economics; provides hands on experience in Mixed-Signal testing using industry funded state-of-the-art test equipment. Prerequisites: ENTC 349 and 352; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

455. Wireless Transmission Systems. (3-2). Credit 4. II

System engineering aspects of microwave, satellite and cellular communication systems; power budget calculations, propagation analysis, systems descriptions; CNR, CIR; review of modulations practical engineering considerations. Prerequisites: ENTC 355; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

462. Control Systems. (3-2). Credit 4. I, II

Fundamentals of real-time closed-loop analog and digital control (the proportional, integral and derivative controller); distributed control systems, sensors, electronics, stepper and servo motors on a 16-bit microcontroller platform; design an autonomous vehicle; open industrial networks, such as Control Area Network (CAN) and DeviceNet technologies, will be discussed. Prerequisites: ENTC 359 and 369; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

463. Mechanical Design Applications II. (3-0). Credit 3. I, II

Application of principles of design to mechanical power transmission elements, such as transmission shafts, gears, belts, chains, bearings, brakes and clutches; use of AUTOCAD/PRO-E and analysis (MECHANICA) packages. Prerequisites: ENTC 361 and 363; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

465. Private Network Design. (3-0). Credit 3. II

Architectures of data and voice networks; network modeling and optimization; centralized and distributed network design; local area to wide area networks interfacing; private and virtual networks; network management; VoIP networks. Prerequisites: ENTC 325, 345 and 415; admitted to major degree sequence (upper-level) in engineering technology.

481. Seminar. (1-0). Credit 1.

Presentation of selected topics from current literature and related industrial operations in various technical areas; films showing practical application of manufacturing and industrial processes; lectures from industrial representatives. Prerequisite: Senior classification.

485. Directed Studies. Credit 1 to 6. I, II, S

Permits work in a special problem area on an individual basis with the intent of promoting independent reading, research and study; to supplement existing course offerings or subjects not presently covered. Prerequisites: Senior classification and approval of instructor.

489. Special Topics in… Credit 1 to 4. I, II, S

Selected topics in an identified area of engineering technology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.