Food Science and Technology - BS, Food Science Option

Food Science and Technology is an exciting multidisciplinary field that prepares majors with a comprehensive knowledge of the biological, physical and engineering sciences to develop new food products, design innovative processing technologies, improve food quality and nutritive value, enhance the safety of foods and ensure the wholesomeness of our food supply. Food Science majors apply the principles learned in the basic sciences such as food chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, food engineering and nutrition to provide consumers with safe, wholesome and attractive food products that contribute to their health and well-being.  For more information, visit http://nfs.tamu.edu

The undergraduate curriculum is approved by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and offers two tracks, a Food Science Option and an Industry Option. These tracks provide promising career opportunities in areas such as food product/process design, technical service, research and development, quality assurance, food safety, food law, regulatory oversight, technological innovation, marketing, corporate sales, sensory evaluation and operations management. There are numerous opportunities available for corporate internships, scholarships and study abroad programs that provide real-world experience and enhance opportunities for employment after completing a baccalaureate degree. The major also provides an excellent background for those interested in professional schools, graduate studies, medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, physical therapy, nursing, occupational therapy and public health.

Food Science Option

The Food Science option provides a strong knowledge base and fundamental understanding of chemistry, biology, engineering, physics, statistics, genetics, biochemistry, microbiology and nutrition that is applied toward the preservation, processing, packaging and distribution on foods that are wholesome, affordable and safe. The goal of the curriculum is to prepare Food Scientists for career opportunities in the food and allied industries or for further studies in graduate or professional schools. See an academic advisor for specific course listings.

First Year
FallSemester Credit Hours
CHEM 101Fundamentals of Chemistry I 3
CHEM 111Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory I 1
ENGL 103 or ENGL 104Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition or Composition and Rhetoric 3
FSTC 201Food Science 3
FSTC 210/NUTR 210Horizons in Nutrition and Food Science 2
Math elective 3
 Term Semester Credit Hours15
Spring
BIOL 111Introductory Biology I 4
CHEM 102Fundamentals of Chemistry II 3
CHEM 112Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory II 1
American history elective 13
Math elective 3
Free elective 21
 Term Semester Credit Hours15
Second Year
Fall
CHEM 227Organic Chemistry I 3
CHEM 237Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1
NUTR 202Fundamentals of Human Nutrition 3
POLS 206American National Government 3
Select one of the following: 3
Introduction to Agricultural Economics  
Principles of Economics  
Principles of Economics  
Language, philosophy and culture elective 13
 Term Semester Credit Hours16
Spring
ACCT 209Survey of Accounting Principles 3
CHEM 228Organic Chemistry II 3
CHEM 238Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1
PHYS 201College Physics 4
American history elective 13
Creative arts elective 13
 Term Semester Credit Hours17
Third Year
Fall
CHEM 316Quantitative Analysis 2
CHEM 318Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 1
ENGL 210Technical and Business Writing 3
HORT 311/FSTC 311Principles of Food Processing 3
POLS 207State and Local Government 3
Free elective 23
 Term Semester Credit Hours15
Spring
FSTC 312/DASC 312Food Chemistry 3
FSTC 313/DASC 313Food Chemistry Laboratory 1
MGMT 309Survey of Management 3
STAT 302Statistical Methods 3
Select one of the following: 3
Meats  
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System  
Fundamental Baking  
Meats  
Food Process Engineering Technology  
Poultry Further Processing  
Nutritional Pharmacometrics of Food Compounds  
Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies  
Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Processing  
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System  
Experimental Nutrition and Food Science Laboratory  
Critical Evaluation of Nutrition and Food Science Literature: Evidence Based Reviews  
Directed Studies  
Special Topics in...  
Research  
Viticulture and Small Fruit Culture  
Concepts of Wine Production  
Enology  
Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Processing  
Scientific Principles of Foods  
Poultry Further Processing  
Free elective 21
 Term Semester Credit Hours14
Fourth Year
Fall
DASC 314/FSTC 314Food Analysis 3
DASC 326/FSTC 326Food Bacteriology 3
DASC 327/FSTC 327Food Bacteriology Lab 1
FSTC 444Fundamentals of Food Law 3
FSTC 481Seminar 1
Free elective 23
 Term Semester Credit Hours14
Spring
AGSM 315/FSTC 315Food Process Engineering Technology 3
BICH 303 or BICH 410Elements of Biological Chemistry or Comprehensive Biochemistry I 3
FSTC 401Food Product Development 3
Select one of the following: 3
Meats  
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System  
Fundamental Baking  
Meats  
Food Process Engineering Technology  
Poultry Further Processing  
Nutritional Pharmacometrics of Food Compounds  
Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies  
Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Processing  
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System  
Experimental Nutrition and Food Science Laboratory  
Critical Evaluation of Nutrition and Food Science Literature: Evidence Based Reviews  
Directed Studies  
Special Topics in...  
Research  
Viticulture and Small Fruit Culture  
Concepts of Wine Production  
Enology  
Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Processing  
Scientific Principles of Foods  
Poultry Further Processing  
Free elective 22
 Term Semester Credit Hours14
 Total Semester Credit Hours: 120
1

The Graduation requirements include a requirement for 6 hours of international and cultural diversity courses. Selection must be from courses on the approved list. Selection can be courses that also satisfy the requirement for social and behavioral sciences; creative arts; language, philosophy and culture; or electives.  For Core Curriculum requirements, http://core.tamu.edu/

2
Students may earn a chemistry minor by taking 6 hours of additional chemistry courses from an approved list as free electives. See the Department of Chemistry for more details. Students seeking a minor in chemistry must complete the Declaration of Minor in Chemistry form and have it approved by the undergraduate advisor in Chemistry (Room 104 Chemistry) and their NFSC advisor.

A total of 120 hours is required for graduation; 36 hours of 300/400 level courses are required to meet the Texas A&M University residency requirement.