Department of English

The study of English language and literature is central to an understanding of our culture and our relationship to it. Mastery of the English language is essential to all of us at Texas A&M, no matter what our interests or profession. An awareness of our heritage as it is embodied in great literary works provides us with a sense of the traditions, ideas, and rhetorics that have shaped us and our world; it enables us to define ourselves and our values in relation to this valued past. The Department of English offers students an opportunity to explore our linguistic and literary inheritance. Courses are offered in British literature, American literature, rhetoric and composition, creative writing, literary criticism, linguistics, and film. Students can discover the roots of the English language or learn about the latest linguistic theories. They can acquire the skills necessary to be a technical writer and editor or begin to learn the craft of writing poetry and fiction. They can immerse themselves in literature from Beowulf to Virginia Woolf, from Captain John Smith to Toni Morrison; and they can explore the extensions and challenges to tradition found in women’s writing, ethnic literature, and postmodernist experimentation. Students also may explore literature in relation to the other arts and religion and culture, and investigate the global through studies in Asian, Africana, Caribbean, postcolonial, transnational and other literatures. The flexibility of the degree in English and the options available in the department enable students to pursue their own interests while acquiring important analytic and writing skills and discovering the riches of our literary heritage.

English graduates, with relevant minors or specialized courses outside English, may pursue careers in technical writing, editing and publishing, government service, public relations, personnel work, and advertising or administrative positions in business and industry. The program in English also provides excellent preparation for later professional training in law, medicine, business and the ministry, as well as for graduate work in information studies and in the humanities, including English. Supported by work in the College of Education and Human Development, the English program also may lead to careers in teaching or educational administration.

The curriculum in English is designed to allow students to develop concentrations in such areas as composition and rhetoric, creative writing, linguistics, literature and film, or coursework relevant to teacher certification.

Teacher Certification Programs in English

Teacher Certification in English Language Arts/Reading - OPTION II (Secondary)

Students desiring certification by Option II to teach English language arts and reading in the secondary schools of Texas should consult an undergraduate English advisor as early as possible. Requirements include 27 semester hours in literature, language, reading, and rhetoric and composition (an optional 24-30 hours in a second teaching field is possible); and professional education courses.

Degree and Certification Program for Middle School in English Language Arts/Reading

The Department of English offers a degree and certification program in English language arts/reading for prospective middle-school teachers. This program requires 36 hours of literature, linguistics, composition and rhetoric and 15 hours of reading along with an 18-hour professional education component.

All students seeking certification should consult an undergraduate English advisor for additional information.

Professional Writing Certificate

The Professional Writing Certificate gives students 18 hours of intensive training in a broad range of communication skills. Students who achieve a grade of B or better in all 18 hours of coursework will receive a certificate signifying their successful completion of this training. Students should allow at least a year and a half to complete the courses, some of which are offered only once a year. Transfer courses, independent studies and credit by exam cannot be counted toward the 18 hours. Required courses include ENGL 210, ENGL 320, ENGL 241 and ENGL 355. With the help of the Professional Writing Certificate Advisor, the student must also select two additional courses in rhetoric, communication or a related field.

ENGL 103 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 1301) Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition. Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising and editing, both individually and corroboratively; emphasis on effective rhetorical choices including audience, purpose, arrangement and style; focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating and critical analysis.

ENGL 104 Composition and Rhetoric

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 1302) Composition and Rhetoric. Focus on referential and persuasive researched essays through the development of analytical reading ability, critical thinking and library research skills; for freshman and sophomore students only.

ENGL 201 Approaches to Literacy

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Origins, functions, and philosophies of literacy; theories of text analysis; development of a broader concept of literacy; enhancement of instruction of communication skills.

ENGL 202 Environmental Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Texts from various periods and locations and in various genres and media that focus on the relationship of human beings to the rest of the natural world; topics vary from each section.

ENGL 203 Writing about Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of literature by genre and/or theme; literary analysis and interpretation; intensive writing about literature.

ENGL 204/AFST 204 Introduction to African-American Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Introduction to the writings of African Americans from the 18th century to the present, emphasizing the major themes and traditions.
Cross Listing: AFST 204/ENGL 204.

ENGL 205/AFST 205 Introduction to Africana Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Works, literary movements and genres of authors of African descent in the Americas, Europe and Africa.
Cross Listing: AFST 205/ENGL 205.

ENGL 206 Twenty-first Century Literature and Culture

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of contemporary literature and culture; such topics as the new multicultural millennium; responses to September 11 and new global realities; the transformation of popular genres.

ENGL 209/LING 209 Introduction to Linguistics

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Nature of human language and of linguistics; includes an introduction to phonology, syntax, semantics and morphology and the role of spoken and written discourse in sustaining societal arrangements.
Cross Listing: LING 209/ENGL 209. Credit cannot be given for both ENGL 209/LING 209 and LING 209/ENGL 209.

ENGL 210 Technical and Business Writing

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2311) Technical and Business Writing. Focus on writing for professional settings; correspondence and researched reports fundamental to the technical and business workplace—memoranda, business letters, research proposals and presentations, use of graphical and document design; emphasis on audience awareness, clarity of communication and collaborative team-work.

ENGL 211/INTS 211 Foundations in Cultural Studies

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Introduction to history, influence and major ideas of Cultural Studies; use of culture as a means to critique social problems and understand social forces; analysis of culture in its relationship to power; participation in project investigating contemporary U.S. youth subcultures.
Cross Listing: INTS 211/ENGL 211.

ENGL 212 Shakespeare

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of selected works of Shakespeare.

ENGL 219 Literature and the Other Arts

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Imaginative literature in conversation with aesthetic principles and such other arts as painting, sculpture, architecture, film and music.

ENGL 221/MODL 221 World Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2332) World Literature. Survey of world literature from the ancient world through the sixteenth century in relation to its historical and cultural contexts; texts selected from a diverse group of authors, traditions and genres.
Cross Listing: MODL 221/ENGL 221.

ENGL 222/MODL 222 World Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2333) World Literature. Survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present in relation to its historical and cultural contexts; texts selected from a diverse group of authors, traditions and genres.
Cross Listing: MODL 222/ENGL 222.

ENGL 227 American Literature: The Beginnings to Civil War

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2327) American Literature: The Beginnings to Civil War. Representative writers, genres and movements of the period.

ENGL 228 American Literature: Civil War to Present

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2328) American Literature: Civil War To Present. Expressions of the American experience in realism, regionalism and naturalism; varieties of modernist and contemporary writing; the rise of ethnic literature and experimental literary forms.

ENGL 231 Survey of English Literature I

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2322) Survey of English Literature I. Literature of England from Anglo-Saxon times through the 18th century.

ENGL 232 Survey of English Literature II

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2323) Survey of English Literature II. Literary works from the late 18th century to the 21st century by authors in Great Britain and its colonies.

ENGL 235 Elements of Creative Writing

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(ENGL 2307) Elements of Creative Writing. Initiation into the craft of creative writing in prose and poetry; extensive reading in the genres; peer workshops.

ENGL 241 Advanced Composition

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Focuses on the writing of advanced academic and professional prose by integrating computer technology in the analysis and production of that prose.

ENGL 251/FILM 251 Introduction to Film Analysis

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Fundamental aspects of film analysis and criticism.
Cross Listing: FILM 251/ENGL 251.

ENGL 253 Introduction to Cultural Studies and Popular Culture

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Introduction to Cultural Studies and Popular Cultural. An introduction to the history, theories and methods of contemporary cultural studies. The course will explore key concepts in cultural theory to examine specific aspects of popular culture as well as cultural sites and practices so as to expand upon the analytical and critical thinking skills learned in ENGL 104 and 203.
Prerequisite: ENGL 104.

ENGL 285 Directed Studies

Credits 0 to 4. 0 to 4 Other Hours.

Readings selected for specific need of major or minor in English.

ENGL 289 Special Topics in...

Credits 1 to 4. 1 to 4 Lecture Hours.

Selected topics in an identified area of English. May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 291 Research

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Lecture Hours.

Research conducted under the direction of faculty member in English.
Prerequisites: 3 hours of 200-level literature; freshman or sophomore classification and approval of instructor.

ENGL 303 Approaches to English Studies

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

A writing intensive exploration of the methodologies and major topics of English studies.
Prerequisite: ENGL 104 or registration therein; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 304 Topics in Digital Research

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Topics in the studies of digital humanities; introduction to making/interpreting digital materials, the surrogates of books, paintings, etc., that form our cultural heritage, as well as digitally-born literature, art and culture; reflection on digital cultures/digital archives; theory and practice of creating and research digital resources. May be taken three times for credit.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 305 Texas Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Examination of Texas literature, culture and multi-media; exploration of the development of Texas identities and responses to the rich cultural diversity within the state; topics vary from each section.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 308 History of Literary Criticism

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

History of literary thought from antiquity to the present, including writers such as Plato, Aristotle, "Longinus," Sidney, Shelley, and Dryden; analysis of genres such as tragedy, lyric, and film; critical approaches such as new criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, feminism, new historicism, and film studies.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 310/LING 310 History of the English Language

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Phonological, grammatical and lexical history of the English language; brief discussion of some other Indo-European languages; principles of linguistic change, as reflected in English.
Prerequisite: LING 209/ENGL 209 or ENGL 209/LING 209.
Cross Listing: LING 310/ENGL 310. Credit cannot be given for both ENGL 310/LING 310 and LING 310/ENGL 310.

ENGL 313 Medieval English Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Old and Middle English literature exclusive of Chaucer, including such authors and works as Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Piers Plowman, Malory, Julian of Norwich, Kempe, the mystery plays and the lyrics.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 314 The English Renaissance

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Period course in the poetry, prose and drama of England in the 16th century.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 315 Seventeenth-Century Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Period course in English poetry, prose and drama of the 17th century.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 316 Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Period course in English poetry, prose and drama of the 18th century.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 317 Early British Drama

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Period course in early British, non- Shakespearean drama to 1642.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at the 200-level or above.

ENGL 320 Technical and Professional Editing

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Principles and techniques of technical editing for print and electronic media, including standards, style, copy-editing, comprehensive editing and project management.
Prerequisite: ENGL 210.

ENGL 321 Nineteenth-Century Literature (Romantic)

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Representative texts in English generated throughout the British empire in the late-18th and early-19th centuries.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 322 Nineteenth-Century Literature (Victorian)

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Period course in English poetry and prose of major Victorian authors.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 323 The American Renaissance

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Period course in the American Renaissance, covering such writers as Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Alcott, Fuller, Douglass, Melville, Poe, Stowe and Whitman.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 329/AFST 329 African-American Literature Pre-1930

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Major works of the African-American literary tradition from the 18th century to 1930 studied within cultural and historical context.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.
Cross Listing: AFST 329/ENGL 329.

ENGL 330 Arthurian Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Legend of King Arthur in English and American literature from its Medieval origins to the present.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 331 Fantasy Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

An exploration of origins and development of fantasy literature, including representative writers, genres and texts.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 333/WGST 333 Gay and Lesbian Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Gay and lesbian literature from classical times to present, studied in its historical and cultural context.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: WGST 333/ENGL 333.

ENGL 334 Science Fiction Present and Past

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Origins and development of the science fiction genre.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 335 Literature of the Sea

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Significance of the sea in fictional and factual accounts, such as novels, short stories, poems, and narratives of sailors and seafaring life.
Prerequisites: Three credits of literature at 200 level or above. Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 336 Life and Literature of the Southwest

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of Southwestern literature, including such authors as Abbey, Anaya, Cabeza de Vaca, Cather, Krutch, McCarty, Momaday, Paz, Paredes and Porter.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 337 Life and Literature of the American South

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Study of writing and culture of the American South based on reading and analysis of key texts by representative authors.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 338 American Ethnic Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Multi-ethnic study of American Literature, the writings of Black Americans, American Indians, Latinos/Latinas, Jewish Americans, as well as other ethnic groups.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 339/AFST 339 African-American Literature Post-1930

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Major works of the African-American literary tradition from the 1930s to the present studied in their cultural and historical context.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.
Cross Listing: AFST 339/ENGL 339.

ENGL 340 Modern and Contemporary Drama

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Representative plays and performances from the late nineteenth century to the present.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 345 Writers’ Studies: Prose or Poetry

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

A different topic for fiction writers or poets each term; may include historical development of genres; connection between biography and artistic production; study of writers' theories of the art of fiction or poetry.
Prerequisites: ENGL 235; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 347 Writers' Workshop: Prose

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Production of advanced, complete stories; peer workshops; extensive reading. May be repeated 1 time for credit.
Prerequisite: ENGL 235; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 348 Writers' Workshop: Poetry

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Production of advanced, complete poems; peer workshops; extensive reading. May be repeated 1 time for credit.
Prerequisite: ENGL 235; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 350 Twentieth-Century Literature to World War II.

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Novelists, poets and dramatists writing in English from the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth century.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 351/FILM 351 Advanced Film

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

A different film topic each term; sample topics: major directors, historical periods, fiction into film, film genres. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: ENGL 251/FILM 251 or FILM 251/ENGL 251 or FILM 301 or approval of instructor; junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: FILM 351/ENGL 351.

ENGL 352 Literature, World War II to Present.

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Novelists, poets and dramatists from the World War II era to the present.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 353 History of Rhetoric

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of the major approaches to the theory and practice of oral and written rhetoric and discourse up to the end of the 19th century.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 354 Modern Rhetorical Theory

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Study of 20th and 21st century rhetorical theories and theorists; focus on relationships among rhetoric and culture, such as rhetoric in oral and textual communities, rhetoric as a method of literary interpretation, rhetoric and linguistics, rhetoric as theorized and taught across academic communities.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 355 The Rhetoric of Style

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Fosters an appreciation for and better understanding of English prose style; the history of English prose; representative prose models for analysis and imitation; the impact of computer analysis.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 356/FILM 356 Literature and Film

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Novels and films based on them; writers and filmmakers such as Virginia Woolf, John Steinbeck, John Ford, Sally Potter, John Huston, Charlotte Bronte and Peter Bogdonavich.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at the 200-level; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.
Cross Listing: FILM 356/ENGL 356.

ENGL 357 Native American Rhetorics and Literatures

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Examination of Native American rhetorics and literatures with a focus on the relationship between composed, performed, and material rhetorics; covering Native American rhetors and writers from pre-colonization to the present and contextualizing them within contemporary Native issues.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 359 Forms of Creative Writing

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Major forms of writing in prose or poetry, depending on instructor; analysis of structure coupled with writing assignments illustrating principles of form in narrative and/or lyrical modes. May be taken three times for credit.
Prerequisites: ENGL 235; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 360 Literature for Children

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Representative writers, genres, texts and movements.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 361 Young Adult Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Survey of historical and contemporary literature for adolescents, including such forms as fantasy, domestic fiction, and the problem novel.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 362/HISP 362 Latino/a Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Literature by U.S.-based Latino/a authors writing mostly in English; examination of historical and social contexts of cultural production; may include novels, poetry, short stories, plays, and films to gain understanding of aesthetic expression of diverse Latino/a authors, including but not limited to Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and Dominican Americans.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: HISP 362/ENGL 362.

ENGL 365/RELS 360 The Bible as Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Narrative, structural, and thematic study of the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures in English translation.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: RELS 360/ENGL 365.

ENGL 372 American Poetry

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of the development of American poetic traditions, with an emphasis on the major poetry of 19th and 20th centuries.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 373 American Realism and Naturalism

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of the literature produced in the United States between the Civil War and World War I, such as works by Twain, James, Freeman, Jewett, Chesnutt, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 374/WGST 374 Women Writers

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

History of literature by women in English; emphasis on continuity of ideas and on literary contributions; study of a variety of genres with particular attention to the significance of gender in the racial, social, sexual and cultural contexts of women writing in English.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: WGST 374/ENGL 374.

ENGL 375 Nineteenth-Century American Novel

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

An exploration of the development of the American novel; study of representative novels from the early national period, the American Renaissance, and realism and naturalism.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 376 The American Novel Since 1900

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Representative novels of 20th and 21st century American writers; emphasis on varied literary movements and on thematic and formal innovations as reflections of/responses to social transformations in American society since 1900.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 377 The British Novel to 1870.

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Representative works illustrating the development of the novel, by writers resident in Great Britain and its colonies, from its beginnings to the late nineteenth century.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above.

ENGL 378 The British Novel, 1870 to Present.

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Representative works illustrating development of the novel by writers resident in Great Britain and its colonies from the late nineteenth century forward.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 379/AFST 379 Postcolonial Literatures

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of key terms, themes and debates within global literature written by colonized, occupied and diasporic peoples.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at the 200-level or above.
Cross Listing: AFST 379/ENGL 379.

ENGL 385 Playwriting

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

The craft of writing plays and practical experience in writing plays of various lengths; structure, building of ideas into dramatic situations, use of dialogue and movement.
Prerequisite: ENGL 235; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 386 Creative Nonfiction

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Practical study and application of literary nonfiction, the general audience essay, the memoir, and related nonfiction forms; with extensive workshop time and attention given to student writing, expert and peer review as well as readings from authors in the genre.
Prerequisites: ENGL 235; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 390 Studies in British Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of a significant topic or period in British literature; features current faculty research on such topics as Victorian fantasy literature, social identity in medieval Britain and Ireland and children in film.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 391 Folklore, Literature, and World Cultures

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Theories of folklore and vernacular culture; exploration of the relationship between oral literature and the forms of vernacular culture, including film, festival and dance.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification.

ENGL 392/RELS 392 Studies in Literature, Religion and Culture

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of literature treating significant religious topics in the context of cultural setting; features current faculty research on such topics as Tolkien and the making of myth, C.S. Lewis, texts and cultures of the Middle East and Victorian women writers and religion.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above; junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: RELS 392/ENGL 392.

ENGL 393/AFST 393 Studies in Africana Literature and Culture

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Literary movements, genres, groups of authors, topics or issues in the literature and culture of people of African descent.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.
Cross Listing: AFST 393/ENGL 393.

ENGL 394 Studies in Genre

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Theory and practice of a single genre including analysis of its history and development; features current faculty research on such topics as women standup comics, British short stories and Irish history on stage and screen. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 396 Studies in American Literature

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of a significant topic or period in American literature; features current faculty research on such topics as Asian-American women writers, American music and literature and American Gothic.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at 200-level or above; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 401 Contemporary Literary Theory

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exposure to the discourses of contemporary theory in engagement with other academic disciplines; study of major theoretical schools, debates, and critiques.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at the 300-level; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 403 Language and Gender

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Language and gender from a sociolinguistic perspective; gender in the words and structures of language; gender representation and gendered language use in the media and a variety of sociocultural contexts; language use in intimate relationships; computer-mediated discourse; language, sexuality, and sexual orientation.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: LING 403 and WGST 403.

ENGL 412 Studies in Shakespeare

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Advanced study of a significant topic in Shakespeare.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at the 300-level; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 414 Milton

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

In-depth study of poetry and selected prose works of John Milton.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at the 300-level; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 415 Studies in a Major Author

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Exploration of a major author as a vehicle for emphasizing intensive analysis, scholarship and literary criticism.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 300-level; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 431 Chaucer

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Intensive analysis of Chaucer's works in Middle English, including engagement with published criticism and scholarship.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of literature at 300-level; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 460 Digital Authoring Practices

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Analysis and practice of authoring in digital environments, including individual and collaborative approaches, audience concerns, theoretical, ethical and stylistic issues; environments and topics may include web design, content management system (CMS), text encoding, project management, usability, version tracking, content authoring and accessibility.
Prerequisites: ENGL 210; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 461 Advanced Syntax and Rhetoric

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Points of view toward language study; traditional syntax; points of view toward rhetoric; Christensen's rhetoric of the paragraph; analysis of written discourse.
Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of instructor.

ENGL 462 Rhetoric in Cultural Context

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Theories concerning the influence of socio-cultural context on expressive forms and how such forms are used to achieve social and communicative aims; analysis of examples of written, verbal, and visual rhetorics from various cultures illustrating the impact that expressive forms have on social life.
Prerequisites: ENGL 353, ENGL 354, or ENGL 355; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 474/WGST 474 Studies in Women Writers

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

A different topic each term examining women’s writing through historical period, genre, cross-cultural study and/or feminist literary theory. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: 3 credits of literature at the 300-level; junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: WGST 474/ENGL 474.

ENGL 481 Senior Seminar

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Capstone seminar on significant figures, movements or issues with special attention to methods and materials of scholarship.
Prerequisites: ENGL 303; senior classification.

ENGL 484 Internship

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Lecture Hours.

Directed internship in a public or private organization to provide students with on-the-job training and applied research experience appropriate to career objectives. May be taken three times for credit. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Prerequisites: Approval of department head; junior or senior classification.

ENGL 485 Directed Studies

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Other Hours.

Readings selected for specific need of major or minor in English.

ENGL 489 Special Topics in...

Credits 1 to 4. 1 to 4 Lecture Hours.

Selected topics in an identified area of English language and literature. May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 491 Research

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Lecture Hours.

Research conducted under the direction of faculty member in English. May be taken three times for credit.
Prerequisites: 12 credits of English, including 3 at 300-level; junior or senior classification and approval of instructor.

ENGL 497 Independent Honors Studies

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Other Hours.

Directed independent studies in the English language and English or American literature.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification either as Honors student or with overall GPR of 3.5 and letter of approval from head of student's major department. May be repeated for credit.

Alonzo, Juan, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of Texas, 2003

Balester, Valerie, Professor
English
PHD, The University of Texas - Austin, 1998

Bendixen, Alfred, Professor Emeritas
English
PHD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1979

Berthold, Dennis, Professor Emeritas
English
PHD, University of Wisconsin - madison, 1972

Bhattacharya, Nandini, Professor
English
PHD, University of Rochester, 1992

Boenig, Robert, Professor
English
PHD, Rutgers University, 1978

Clark, William, Professor
English
PHD, Louisiana State University & A&M College, 1973

Collins, Michael, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Columbia University, 1999

Cooper, Rich, Lecturer
English
PHD, Louisiana State University, 2011

Delnegro, Giovanna, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Indiana University, 1999

Dickson, Donald, Professor
English
PHD, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1981

Duplessis, Nicole, Lecturer
English
PHD, Texas A&M University, 2008

Dworkin, Ira, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, City University of New York, 2003

Earhart, Amy, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1999

Egenolf, Susan, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1995

Eide, Marian, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of Pennsylvania, 1994

Estill, Laura, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, Wayne State University, 2010

Ezell-Mainzer, Margaret, Distinguished Professor
English
PHD, Cambridge University, 1981

Griffin, Robert, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Yale University, 1985

Hannah, James, Professor
English
MFA, University of Iowa, 1980

Harner, James, Professor Emeritas
English
PHD, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1972

Harris, Jason, Lecturer
English
PHD, University of Washington, 2001

Hawkins, Cecelia, Instructional Professor
English
MA, Stephen F. Austin State University, 1975

Hoagwood, Terence, Professor
English
PHD, University of Maryland, 1979

Hodgson, Lucia, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, University of Southern California, 2009

Howell, Jessica, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, University of California, Davis, 2008

Ives, Maura, Professor
English
PHD, University of Virginia, 1990

Jackson, Shona, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Stanford University, 2005

Johansen Aase, Emily, Associate Professor
English
PHD, McMaster University, 2008

Kallendorf, Craig, Professor
English
PHD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1982

Kendall, Shari, Associate Professor
English
PHD, Georgetown University, 1999

Loving, Jerome, Distinguished Professor
English
PHD, Duke University, 1973

Machann, Clinton, Professor
English
PHD, University of Texas, 1976

Mandell, Laura, Professor
English
PHD, Cornell University, 1992

Matthews, Pamela, Professor
English
PHD, Duke University, 1988

McCann, Janet, Professor
English
PHD, University of Pittsburgh, 1974

McWhirter, David, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of Virginia, 1984

Mitchell, J, Professor Emeritas
English
PHD, The University of Iowa, 1971

Mize, Britt, Associate Professor
English
PHD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2003

Morey, Anne, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of Texas- Austin, 1998

Murray, Christine, Instructional Assistant Professor
English
PHD, University of Texas at Arlington, 2005

Nair, Dimple, Lecturer
English
MA, University of Mysore (India), 1997

Nelson, Claudia, Professor
English
PHD, Indiana University, 1989

O'Farrell, Mary, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of California, Berkeley, 1991

Oliver, Lawrence, Professor
English
PHD, The Pennsylvania State University, 1981

Perry, Nandra, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2003

Pilsch, Andrew, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, The Pennsylvania State University, 2011

Portales, Marco, Professor
English
PHD, University of Buffalo, 1975

Reddy, Vanita, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, University of California, Davis, 2009

Reynolds, Larry, Distinguished Professor
English
PHD, Duke University, 1974

Robinson, Elizabeth, Instructional Associate Professor
English
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1995

Robinson, Sally, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of Washingtion, 1989

Ross, Shawna, Assistant Professor
English
PHD, The Pennsylvania State University, 2011

Rowell, Charles, Professor
English
PHD, Ohio State University, 1972

Stabile, Susan, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University of Delaware, 1997

Swearingen, C, Professor Emeritas
English
PHD, The University of Texas - Austin, 1978

Tebeaux, Elizabeth, Professor
English
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1977

Tuhkanen, Mikko, Associate Professor
English
PHD, University at Buffalo, 2005

Vasilakis, Apostolos, Instructional Assistant Professor
English
PHD, Emory University, 2004

Warren, Nancy, Professor
English
PHD, Indiana University, 1997

White, Lowell, Lecturer
English
PHD, Texas A&M University, 2010

Wollock, Jennifer, Professor
English
PHD, Harvard University, 1981