College of Liberal Arts

Administrative Officers

Dean - Pamela R. Matthews, Ph.D.

Associate Dean - Patricia A. Hurley, Ph.D.

Associate Dean - Steven M. Oberhelman, Ph.D.

Associate Dean - Srividya Ramasubramanian, Ph.D.

Associate Dean - Gerianne Alexander, Ph.D.

Associate Dean - Paul Wellman, Ph.D.

Associate Dean - Leroy Dorsey, Ph.D.

Assistant Dean - Cheryl L. Hanks, M.A.

General Statement

The College of Liberal Arts offers students an opportunity to explore the intellectual achievements of humankind through a disciplined and responsible study of issues that have been of enduring importance to people. Thus, courses in liberal arts help students develop a sensitivity to the questions and values that confront them in their daily lives. At the same time, skills are built which can be put to use in solving complex problems. One of the program’s principal objectives is to achieve the hallmark of an educated person: a fundamental knowledge of the forces that have shaped and continue to direct our cultural identity.

The purpose of the undergraduate program in the College of Liberal Arts is to foster independent thinking by offering students a broad education. To achieve this, the college supports the aims of the University Core Curriculum, which requires all students to engage in specific studies intended to promote an awareness of their heritage, their culture, and their environment. Students who choose to major in one of the Liberal Arts disciplines will complete a curriculum designed to promote this breadth of understanding while providing a focus through concentration in one specific area of study.

The first two years of undergraduate study in the College of Liberal Arts introduce students to the full range of arts, humanities, science, mathematics and social science areas that are established in the University Core Curriculum. During the last two years, students concentrate on their major and minor fields of study and complete their program with appropriate elective hours. Throughout the program, skills in critical thinking and in communication are developed, strengthened and polished.

Many graduates with bachelor’s degrees in liberal arts continue their study at the graduate level in an academic discipline or in a profession such as medicine or law. The majority go directly into the job market. Studies have shown that liberal arts graduates are very successful in a variety of activities in commerce, business, or public service because the knowledge and skills they have developed are valuable in today’s world. Many businesses actively recruit liberal arts majors.

Thus, whether as a foundation for further study or as a broad education preparatory to positions in business, industry, and the public domain, a liberal arts degree has intrinsic worth and enduring value.

General Degree Requirements

Degree requirements for Liberal Arts majors are organized into:

  1. General Requirements, including University Core Curriculum requirements and College of Liberal Arts requirements
  2. Requirements of the Major Field of Study
  3. Requirements of the Minor Field of Study
  4. Electives

A minimum of 120 acceptable hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree. A minimum of 36 hours of 300- or 400-level coursework must be completed at Texas A&M University.

General Requirements

The areas listed below include University Core Curriculum requirements and College of Liberal Arts requirements. The completion of requisite hours in these areas will thus satisfy both University Core Curriculum and college requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Requirements

Communication 1
ENGL 104Composition and Rhetoric3
Select one of the following:3
Writing about Literature
Technical and Business Writing
Public Speaking
Communication for Technical Professions
Argumentation and Debate
Literature in English
Select two of the following:6
Environmental Literature
Writing about Literature 2
Introduction to African-American Literature
Introduction to Africana Literature
Twenty-first Century Literature and Culture
Shakespeare
Literature and the Other Arts
World Literature
World Literature
American Literature: The Beginnings to Civil War
American Literature: Civil War to Present
Survey of English Literature I
Survey of English Literature II
Medieval English Literature
The English Renaissance
Seventeenth-Century Literature
Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture
Early British Drama
Nineteenth-Century Literature (Romantic)
Nineteenth-Century Literature (Victorian)
The American Renaissance
African-American Literature Pre-1930
Arthurian Literature
Fantasy Literature
Gay and Lesbian Literature
Science Fiction Present and Past
Life and Literature of the Southwest
Life and Literature of the American South
American Ethnic Literature
African-American Literature Post-1930
Modern and Contemporary Drama
Twentieth-Century Literature to World War II.
Literature, World War II to Present.
Literature and Film
Native American Rhetorics and Literatures
Literature for Children
Young Adult Literature
Latino/a Literature
The Bible as Literature
American Poetry
American Realism and Naturalism
Women Writers
Nineteenth-Century American Novel
The American Novel Since 1900
The British Novel to 1870.
The British Novel, 1870 to Present.
Postcolonial Literatures
Studies in British Literature
Folklore, Literature, and World Cultures
Studies in Literature, Religion and Culture
Studies in Africana Literature and Culture
Studies in Genre
Studies in American Literature
Studies in Shakespeare
Milton
Studies in a Major Author
Chaucer
Studies in Women Writers
Introduction to African-American Literature
Introduction to Africana Literature
African-American Literature Pre-1930
African-American Literature Post-1930
Postcolonial Literatures
Studies in Africana Literature and Culture
Literature and Film
Latino/a Literature
World Literature
World Literature
Studies in Literature, Religion, and Culture
Gay and Lesbian Literature
Women Writers
Studies in Women Writers
Foreign Language 3
Option 114
Select one of the following:
Beginning Arabic I
and Beginning Arabic II
Beginning Chinese I
and Beginning Chinese II
Beginning Classical Greek I
and Beginning Classical Greek II
Beginning Latin I
and Beginning Latin II
Beginning French I
and Beginning French II
Beginning German I
and Beginning German II
Beginning Italian I
and Beginning Italian II
Beginning Japanese I
and Beginning Japanese II
Beginning Russian I
and Beginning Russian II
Beginning Spanish I
and Beginning Spanish II
Select one of the following:
Intermediate Arabic I
and Intermediate Arabic II
Intermediate Chinese I
and Intermediate Chinese II
Intermediate Greek
   or Advanced Greek: New Testament 
   or Advanced Classical Greek Poetry 
   or Advanced Classical Greek Prose 
Intermediate Latin I
and Intermediate Latin II
Intermediate French I
and Intermediate French II
   or Field Studies I and Field Studies II 
Intermediate German I
and Intermediate German II
   or Field Studies I and Field Studies II 
Intermediate Italian I
and Intermediate Italian II
Intermediate Japanese I
and Intermediate Japanese II
Intermediate Russian I
and Intermediate Russian II
   or Field Studies I and Field Studies II 
Intermediate Spanish I
and Intermediate Spanish II
   or Field Studies Abroad I and Field Studies Abroad II 
Option 2
Foreign language placement test results determine foreign language course levels required 3
Option 3
Advanced Placement or Reading Achievement foreign language test results determine foreign language course levels required 3
Mathematics
Mathematics (3 hours must be in MATH)6
Life and Physical Sciences
Life and physical sciences elective9
Creative Arts and Language, Philosophy and Culture 4
Creative arts elective 53
Language, philosophy and culture elective3
Language, philosophy and culture or creative arts 53
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Social and behavioral sciences elective 46
American History
American history elective 66
Government/Political Science
Government/Political science elective 66
International Cultures and Diversity
International and cultural diversity elective 76
Total Semester Credit Hours74
1

Students must demonstrate the ability to express themselves in acceptable written English. The College requirement is satisfied if a student earns a grade of C or better in ENGL 203.

Students who do not meet this standard must repeat the course prior to completing 60 hours and earn a grade of C or better or must immediately arrange with the director of the writing laboratory to be certified as competent in writing.

2

ENGL 203 will count toward the Communication requirement or the Literature in English requirement, but will not count toward both requirements.

3

Students must take a foreign language placement test if they:

  • intend to enroll for the first time in a college Spanish, French, German, Russian, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Classical Greek, Italian, or Latin course and
  • have knowledge of the language acquired in any way

The placement test serves as a basis for credit by examination. Placement tests are offered throughout the calendar year by the Department of Hispanic Studies for Spanish and by the Department of International Studies for all other languages.

Students who have taken the Advanced Placement (AP) test or the Reading Achievement test in their foreign language of choice may substitute the test results for the placement exam.

4

No course used to fulfill this requirement may fulfill any other college of University requirement except in the minor field of study.

5

Minimum of 3 and maximum of 6 semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

6

Courses in military, air or naval science may not be substituted for required courses.

7

The list of approved courses is available in the degree audit for each major.

Bachelor of Science Requirements

Communication
ENGL 104Composition and Rhetoric 13
Select one of the following:3
Writing about Literature
Technical and Business Writing
Public Speaking
Communication for Technical Professions
Argumentation and Debate
Literature in English
Select two of the following:6
Environmental Literature
Writing about Literature 2
Introduction to African-American Literature
Introduction to Africana Literature
Twenty-first Century Literature and Culture
Shakespeare
Literature and the Other Arts
World Literature
World Literature
American Literature: The Beginnings to Civil War
American Literature: Civil War to Present
Survey of English Literature I
Survey of English Literature II
Medieval English Literature
The English Renaissance
Seventeenth-Century Literature
Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture
Early British Drama
Nineteenth-Century Literature (Romantic)
Nineteenth-Century Literature (Victorian)
The American Renaissance
African-American Literature Pre-1930
Arthurian Literature
Fantasy Literature
Gay and Lesbian Literature
Science Fiction Present and Past
Life and Literature of the Southwest
Life and Literature of the American South
American Ethnic Literature
African-American Literature Post-1930
Modern and Contemporary Drama
Twentieth-Century Literature to World War II.
Literature, World War II to Present.
Literature and Film
Native American Rhetorics and Literatures
Literature for Children
Young Adult Literature
Latino/a Literature
The Bible as Literature
American Poetry
American Realism and Naturalism
Women Writers
Nineteenth-Century American Novel
The American Novel Since 1900
The British Novel to 1870.
The British Novel, 1870 to Present.
Postcolonial Literatures
Studies in British Literature
Folklore, Literature, and World Cultures
Studies in Literature, Religion and Culture
Studies in Africana Literature and Culture
Studies in Genre
Studies in American Literature
Studies in Shakespeare
Milton
Studies in a Major Author
Chaucer
Studies in Women Writers
Introduction to African-American Literature
Introduction to Africana Literature
African-American Literature Pre-1930
African-American Literature Post-1930
Postcolonial Literatures
Studies in Africana Literature and Culture
Literature and Film
Latino/a Literature
World Literature
World Literature
Studies in Literature, Religion, and Culture
Gay and Lesbian Literature
Women Writers
Studies in Women Writers
Foreign Language 3
Select one of the following:8
Beginning Arabic I
and Beginning Arabic II
Beginning Chinese I
and Beginning Chinese II
Beginning Classical Greek I
and Beginning Classical Greek II
Beginning Latin I
and Beginning Latin II
Beginning French I
and Beginning French II
Beginning German I
and Beginning German II
Beginning Italian I
and Beginning Italian II
Beginning Japanese I
and Beginning Japanese II
Beginning Russian I
and Beginning Russian II
Beginning Spanish I
and Beginning Spanish II
Mathematics
Mathematics elective (3 hours must be in MATH)6
Life and Physical Sciences
Life and physical sciences elective9
Creative Arts and Language, Philosophy and Culture 4
Creative arts elective 53
Language, philosophy and culture elective3
Language, philosophy and culture or creative arts elective 43
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Social and behavioral sciences elective 46
American History
American history elective 66
Government/Political Science
Goverment/Political science elective 66
International Cultures and Diversity
International and cultural diversity elective 76
Computing Science, Mathematics, Science, Statistics
Prescribed courses by major department6
Total Semester Credit Hours74
1

Students must demonstrate the ability to express themselves in acceptable written English. The College requirement is satisfied if a student earns a grade of C or better in ENGL 203.

Students who do not meet this standard must repeat the course prior to completing 60 hours and earn a grade of C or better or must immediately arrange with the director of the writing laboratory to be certified as competent in writing.

2

ENGL 203 will count toward the Communication requirement or the Literature in English requirement, but will not count toward both requirements.

3

Two years of high school foreign language may be used to satisfy this requirement unless specified by major.

4

No course used to fulfill this requirement may fulfill any other college or university requirement except in the minor field of study.

5

Minimum of 3 and maximum of 6 semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

6

Courses in military, air or naval science may not be substituted for required courses.

7

 The list of approved courses is available in the degree audit for each major.

Major Field of Study

Each department sets its own requirements for the major, including no fewer than 27 hours of coursework and no more than 33 hours (except for the BA in Music). At least 12 semester hours in the major must be completed in advanced courses (300- and 400-level), and at least 12 semester hours in the major field must be completed in residence at Texas A&M. A grade of C or higher is required in a course to be counted toward the major.

Minor Field of Study

Completion of a minor is not a requirement of the College of Liberal Arts; however, individual departments may require their majors to have a minor. Students should consult with an advisor in their major department to determine if a minor is required. The minor program comprises 15–18 hours with a minimum of 6 hours in residence at the 300- to 400-level. Minor programs are recognized on the transcript after graduation, but not on the diploma. A grade of C or higher is required if a course is to be counted toward the minor field. Each student who is required to complete a minor, or who chooses to do so, should contact the department that offers the minor to determine which specific courses are mandated. The student’s college and/or major department determines the number of minor programs a student may seek and shall be responsible for advising after the student receives signed approval from the department, program, or college granting the minor program.

Electives

To enhance the traditionally broad background of the liberal arts graduate, undergraduate students are allowed to include in their degree program a minimum of 9 semester hours of free elective courses. These courses may be chosen from any field within the University except from a student’s major field. (See section on “Requirements for a Baccalaureate Degree” in this catalog.) All other elective hours must be selected with the approval of the student’s advisor and dean.

  • STLC 101, STLC 102 and STLC 289 may only be taken on an S/U basis.
  • Lower level (100 and 200 level) military science coursework (AERS, MLSC, NVSC) does not apply to degree requirements in the College of Liberal Arts.
  • No more than 14 semester credit hours combined of KINE 199 and upper-level Military Science or SOMS courses may be used as electives.
  • Any undergraduate student may take up to four semester credit hours of KINE 199 on an S/U basis.
  • In the College of Liberal Arts, students who have less than a 2.0 GPR and who enroll in KINE 199 must enroll in the course on an S/U basis.
  • Juniors and seniors in the College of Liberal Arts whose cumulative GPR is 2.50 or above may take up to 12 semester credit hour hours of “free electives” on an S/U basis.
  • Transfer students must take at least 12 semester credit hours of regular coursework at Texas A&M before enrolling in a course on an S/U basis.
  • Courses offered only on an S/U basis may be taken by freshmen and sophomores. These courses count toward the 12 semester credit hour limit.

Combined Degree Plan, Double Degree and Double Major

Students may pursue a program to qualify for two bachelor’s degrees, either a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science degree from different departments, or two Bachelor of Arts or two Bachelor of Science degrees, with the second degree from another college. Alternatively, instead of a major and a minor field, students in the College of Liberal Arts may elect to have two Liberal Arts major fields of study. Both majors may be within the college, or one major may be outside the college, provided both majors lead to the same baccalaureate degree.

Students must declare the double degree no later than the semester in which they will complete 90 hours. Students must have and maintain at least a 3.0 GPR cumulative and in the majors (or the minimum departmental GPR requirement in the major, whichever is higher), with at least a 3.0 GPR in at least 9 hours in the second field of study at the time of declaration. Before declaring the double degree, students should consult with the appropriate advisors to formulate the combined degree plan. The following requirements must be met: the student must

  1. satisfy all University and college requirements
  2. complete all required courses in each major, if both majors are in the College of Liberal Arts (i.e., take all courses that are specifically listed in each regular degree program)
  3. in cases where one major is in the College of Liberal Arts and the other major is in another college, the student shall take in his or her liberal arts major field of study the same number of credit hours required of regular majors in that field and also satisfy whatever conditions are set by the other college for its major field

Candidates for a double bachelor’s degree must have been in residence at least two academic years and must complete all essential work of the second curriculum not covered in the first. To qualify for the double degree, the student must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours more than the higher number of semester credit hours required for either degree.

Curricular Options

International and Intercultural Experiences

The International and Cultural Diversity requirement encourages all students to learn about attitudes and cultures different from their own. All students are required to select from a list of approved courses that foster greater awareness of our interdependent and diverse world.

Students also may select, as free electives, courses which address cultural diversity issues in the United States. Courses in this area encourage students to focus on issues of race, ethnicity and gender and to develop a broader understanding of the diverse cultures and traditions in the United States.

Further opportunity to increase international and national intercultural awareness can be accomplished through study abroad and internship programs. More information on these programs is available through the Undergraduate Programs Office in the College of Liberal Arts.

Liberal Arts Honors Program

The College of Liberal Arts encourages qualified majors to participate in its Honors Program, which is designed for academically talented high school graduates who have distinguished secondary school records (top 10%) and high scores on achievement tests (1250 SAT or 28 ACT). Students accepted into the program take courses that foster an interdisciplinary outlook characteristic of the Liberal Arts and that synthesize knowledge from other courses. Participants work in small classes with some of the most distinguished faculty at Texas A&M University. Students develop their own interests and have the option to write an honors thesis under the direct supervision of a professor with whom they have chosen to work. For information about Texas A&M Honors Program and Fellows Program (i.e., the senior thesis), see the Honors and Undergraduate Research website. Individual departments may have their own Honors program for their majors.

Interdisciplinary Minors

Interdisciplinary minors are offered in Africana Studies, Asian Studies, Comparative Cultural Studies, Film Studies, Hispanic Studies for Community Engagement, Journalism Studies, Latino/a Mexican American Studies, Religious Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Specific course requirements and options are available from each interdisciplinary program director.

Cooperative Education Program

Cooperative education enables students to gain practical work experience and a salary while completing academic requirements. During the four-year academic program, co-op students complete two to four periods of work away from campus, gaining experience through on-the-job training and thus improving their opportunities for future employment. An advisor in the cooperative education office provides additional information about this program.

Government Service (MPA Programs)

Most graduate programs in public administration recommend a broad background of knowledge and skills in the following areas: the political, social, economic and legal context of administration; analytical tools; individual, group and organizational dynamics; policy analysis; administrative/management processes; and arts and science foundation skills. Students are best prepared for an MPA program if their undergraduate programs are multidisciplinary in nature, drawing upon political science, economics, the behavioral sciences, the quantitative sciences, and administrative and managerial sciences.

Law

Most law school admissions committees require a student to have a baccalaureate degree, or equivalent, as well as an acceptable score on the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). In general, law schools prefer that a student seek a diverse college education rather than one which is narrowly specialized. They favor thorough learning in some broad cultural field of a student’s choice, such as history, economics, political science, philosophy, mathematics, science, literature, or the classics. Admissions committees rarely favor concentration in specialized, technical curricula unless such study is adequately supplemented by advanced work in the social sciences and humanities. The Law School Admissions Test Council and the Council of the Section on Legal Education and Admissions of the American Bar Association both advise against the taking of satisfactory/unsatisfactory courses by students intending to go to law school.

The college now offers a university studies degree in pre-law (B.A. in Society, Ethics and Law).  Advising for pre-law students regardless of major, including application forms for taking the Law School Admissions Test, may be obtained from the Office of Professional School Advising.

Medicine

Advising for all pre-health students, including medical and dental students, may be obtained from the Office of Professional School Advising. Students are urged to stop by the office to pick up information on professional schools and talk with an advisor very early in their collegiate career.

Teacher Certification

Students majoring in one of the departments of the College of Liberal Arts and working toward a teaching certificate must meet the minimum requirements described in the College of Education and Human Development section under secondary teacher certification. Because many certification requirements are determined by the State of Texas and thus are subject to periodic change, students working toward certification should maintain frequent contact with advisors in the College of Education and Human Development.

Theology

The American Association of Theological Schools recommends that students planning to enter a theological seminary include in their undergraduate curriculum the following subjects.

English (6 semesters)
History (3 semesters)
Philosophy (3 semesters)
Natural science (2 semesters)
Social science (6 semesters)
Foreign language (4 semesters): Latin, German or French
Religion (3 semesters).

Courses taught at Texas A&M in religion include:

ENGL 365/RELS 360The Bible as Literature3
HUMA 211/RELS 211Hebrew Scriptures3
HUMA 213/RELS 213New Testament3
HUMA 303/RELS 303Near Eastern Religions3
HUMA 304/RELS 304Indian and Oriental Religions3
PHIL 331/RELS 331Philosophy of Religion3
SOCI 326/RELS 326Sociology of Religion3

For more information, see the Director of the Religious Studies Program in the college.

The English Language Institute

The English Language Institute (ELI) offers a comprehensive program designed to help international students improve their English language ability. The goal of the English Language Institute is to provide the necessary language and cultural skills for international students to enter and participate in academic programs at Texas A&M. This intensive English program facilitates international students’ participation in technology, science and management. Enriched by the arts and humanities, the program serves current and future University students and emphasizes diversity and excellence.

Full-time ELI admitted students receive 25 hours of instruction per week, while part-time admitted students take from 3 to 12 or more hours per week. ELI classes meet on a regular University semester schedule in classrooms on the Texas A&M campus.

The ELI uses the most current textbooks, supplementary materials, language learning equipment and instructional techniques in the field of language learning. Courses emphasize listening and reading comprehension, fluency in speaking and writing, and the development of pronunciation skills, vocabulary and grammar. Courses are offered at beginning (100), intermediate (200), and advanced (300) levels. In addition, 500-level courses in oral skills prepare graduate students to serve as teaching assistants, while 500-level courses in composition teach preparation for thesis and dissertation writing. For more information, contact the ELI Office at (979) 845-7936.

College of Liberal Arts

Department of Anthropology

Department of Communication

Department of Economics

Department of English

Department of Hispanic Studies

Department of History

Department of International Studies

Department of Performance Studies

Department of Philosophy and Humanities

Department of Political Science

Department of Psychology

Department of Sociology

Department of Anthropology

Department of Communication

Department of Economics

Department of English

Department of Hispanic Studies

Department of History

Department of Performance Studies

Department of Philosophy and Humanities

Department of Political Science

Department of Psychology

Department of Sociology

Department of Anthropology

Department of Communication

Department of Economics

Department of English

Department of Hispanic Studies

Department of History

Department of Philosophy and Humanities

Department of Political Science

Department of Psychology

Department of Sociology

1

Step 1 Doctoral Program with Texas A&M International University-Corpus Christi and Texas A&M University-Kingsville.