Department of Nutrition

Nutritional sciences prepares majors with a comprehensive knowledge of the biological and social sciences to understand the relationships between nutrients, food components and human health. Prevention of diseases that are related to lifestyle, particularly diet and nutrition, is a focus of the curriculum. Core courses emphasize the role of nutrients in biochemistry, genetics, physiology, microbiology and immunology that promotes wellness and enhances the quality of life. The major also provides an excellent background for those interested in pursuing graduate degrees in biological, nutritional or food sciences; professional degrees in human or veterinary medicine; degrees in dentistry, pharmacy, physical therapy, nursing, public health and other health professions; or dietetic internships.

The Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) and the Graduate Degree/Dietetic Internship Program are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). Students who successfully complete the DPD and a dietetic internship are eligible to take the Registration Examination to become a Registered Dietitian (RD).

Three curriculum tracks are offered (General Nutrition, Didactic Program in Dietetics and Molecular and Experimental Nutrition) to provide flexibility in one’s chosen career path. The Nutrition major prepares one for graduate school, corporate wellness positions, health promotion programs, the food industry, public health programs, pharmaceutical sales, clinical dietetics, medical and research laboratories, biotechnology firms, government agencies and related fields.  For more information, visit http://nfs.tamu.edu.

NFSC 202 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

(BIOL 1322, HECO 1322) Fundamentals of Human Nutrition. Principles of nutrition with application to the physiologic needs of individuals; food sources and selection of an adequate diet; formulation of Recommended Dietary Allowances; nutritional surveillance; for non-nutrition majors only.

NFSC 203 Scientific Principles of Human Nutrition

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Chemistry and physiology of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals; their ingestion, digestion, absorption, transport and metabolism.
Prerequisite: CHEM 119; majors only.

NFSC 211 Scientific Principles of Foods

Credits 4. 3 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Basic principles underlying selection, preparation and preservation of food in relation to quality standards, acceptability and aesthetics. Introduction to composition, nutritive value, chemical and physical properties of foods; introduction to experimental study of foods.
Prerequisites: CHEM 101, CHEM 111; NFSC 202 or NFSC 203; sophomore classification or above.

NFSC 222 Nutrition for Health and Health Care

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Analysis of nutrition with emphasis on providing a basic understanding of nutrition and its role in disease prevention and treatment.

NFSC 289 Special Topics in...

Credits 1 to 4. 1 to 4 Other Hours.

Selected topics in an identified area of nutrition and food science. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

NFSC 301 Nutrition Through Life

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Analysis of nutrition with emphasis on human biological needs through stages of the life cycle; biochemical, physiological and anthropometric aspects of nutrition.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203; junior classification or approval of department head.

NFSC 303/ANSC 303 Principles of Animal Nutrition

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Scientific approach to nutritional roles of water, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, minerals, vitamins, and other dietary components; emphasis on the comparative aspects of gastrointestinal tracts and on digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients.
Prerequisites: CHEM 119 and a grade of C or better in ANSC 113, or CHEM 222 or CHEM 227; junior classification or approval of instructor.
Cross Listing: ANSC 303/NFSC 303.

NFSC 304 Food Service Systems Management

Credits 4. 3 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Principles of food service management used in selecting, storing, preparing and serving food in quantity; emphasis on menu planning, quality control, purchasing, equipment and layout/design; application of basic food service systems management principles, including financial planning and personnel issues.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203 and NFSC 211, junior or senior classification.

NFSC 365 Nutritional Physiology of Vitamins and Minerals

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Fundamental nutritional significance of fat soluble and water soluble vitamins and minerals to human metabolism, cell biology and physiology; micro-nutrient groups as per metabolic function or biochemical and physiological actions; important dietary sources, absorption, storage, metabolism, (bio)chemistry, deficiency and toxicity of individual nutrients in this context and basis of DRIs.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203 and NFSC 301; junior or senior classification.

NFSC 404 Nutrition Assessment and Planning

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Examines the methods of determining the nutritional status of individuals, dietary assessment techniques, planning nutritional care including diet modification and nutrition counseling.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203, NFSC 211 and NFSC 301; junior classification or approval of department head.

NFSC 407 Nutrition Care and Therapy

Credits 4. 3 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Application of the Nutrition Care Process for clinical diagnoses and conditions; planning of nutritional care plans for complex patients, including the formulation and planning for enteral and parenteral nutrition support.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203, NFSC 211, NFSC 301 and NFSC 404; junior classification; dietetics track; or approval of instructor.

NFSC 412 Nutritional Treatment of Disease

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Nutritional intervention in pathological conditions, based on biochemical, physiological and psychological effects of disease state; current research in clinical nutrition.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203; NFSC 301, BIOL 319 and BICH 410, or concurrent enrollment; senior classification or approval of instructor.

NFSC 430 Community Nutrition

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Principles of assessing nutrition problems in populations and planning nutrition programs to promote health in communities including nutrition education and food and nutrition policy; introduction to food and nutrition assistance programs.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203 and NFSC 301; junior or senior classification.

NFSC 440 Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Topics relevant to alimentary (gastrointestinal) microbiology including (i) the "normal" intestinal microbiota; (ii) probiotic and prebiotic nutritional supplements; (iii) recombinant pharmabiotics; (iv) gut-associated lymphoid tissue and mucosal immunity; (v) foodborne gastrointestinal pathogens; and (vi) fermented products as functional foods.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate survey course in microbiology or approval of instructor; junior or senior classification.

NFSC 450 Nutrition and Metabolism of Minerals

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

The role of minerals in living systems and the exploration of their multitude of functions; chemical properties of minerals and how that relates to function in cells and tissues; consequences of mineral deficiencies based on known functions; insight into experimental approaches used to assess minerals in a living environment.
Prerequisite: NFSC 203, BICH 303, or BICH 410, or approval of instructor.

NFSC 469 Experimental Nutrition Laboratory

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Investigation of tools and molecular techniques used in studies of nutrition and metabolism (e.g. obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, etc.); didactic and hands-on laboratory components; includes model systems, measurements of energy balance, body composition, RNA and protein analyses.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

NFSC 471 Critical Evaluation of Nutrition and Food Science Literature: Evidence Based Reviews

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Evaluation of scientific literature, research methods within the literature, and the quality of scientific studies to produce an evidence-based review in areas specific to nutrition and food science.
Prerequisites: NFSC 202 or NFSC 203; STAT 302; junior or senior classification; knowledge of technical writing helpful.

NFSC 475 Nutrition and Physiological Chemistry

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Fundamentals of physiology, biochemistry and nutrition and their relationship to the organismic and cellular metabolism of animals; biochemical basis of hormonal action.
Prerequisites: NFSC 203, NFSC 301, NFSC 365, and BICH 410; senior classification or approval of department head.

Allred, Clinton, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2002

Beathard, Karen, Senior Lecturer
Nutrition
MS, Texas Woman's University, Denton, 1990

Chapkin, Robert, University Distinguished Professor
Nutrition
PHD, University of California, Davis, 1986

Chew, Boon, Professor
Nutrition
PHD, Purdue University, 1978

Geismar, Karen, Senior Lecturer
Nutrition
PHD, Texas Woman's University, Denton, 1998

Giles, Erin, Assistant Professor
Nutrition
PHD, McMaster University, 2015

Guo, Shaodong, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, Peking University, Beijing China, 1995

Johnston, Bradley, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, University of Alberta, 2009

Lorenz, Saundra, Senior Lecturer
Nutrition
MS, Texas A&M University, 2002

Seguin, Rebecca, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, Tufts University, 2008

Sun, Yuxiang, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, University of Manitoba, 2000

Wu, Chaodong, Professor
Nutrition
PHD, Beijing Medical University, 1998

Xie, Linglin, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, Kansas State University, 2008

Zhang, Ke, Associate Professor
Nutrition
PHD, Kansas State University, 2008