Department of Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management

Head: Roel Lopez
Associate Head: Gerard Kyle
Graduate Advisor: Amanda Ray

Graduate programs of study and research lead to the MS and PhD degrees in Rangeland, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management. These programs prepare students for careers with academic institutions, governmental agencies, and private business/industry. Studies in environmental conservation and education are available to those students interested in preparing themselves for public service in a number of fields other than research and management. The non-thesis Master of Wildlife Science and Master of Natural Resource Development degree programs are designed to give students broad academic training combined with practical experience, to develop problem-solving and management skills. The MS (thesis option) and PhD degrees require a strong background in the basic and applied agricultural and life sciences, particularly as they relate to whole-organism biological systems. The latter two degrees involve intensive research, and the resulting thesis or dissertation must demonstrate superior knowledge and understanding of the subject area.

Graduate study in the Department of Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management normally requires some breadth in several disciplines, which differ among courses of study and are dependent on candidate background. The academic program of study is tailored to the background and educational goals of each degree candidate in consultation with his or her Graduate Advisory Committee. There are no foreign language requirements for any of the department’s graduate degree programs unless set by the student’s Advisory Committee or the University.

Research activities in the department involve vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and natural-resource systems, and span the broad fields of wildlife ecology and management, fisheries ecology and management, aquaculture, biodiversity and systematics, conservation education/museum science and the human dimensions of wildlife and fisheries resource management. Research in these fields is supported by disciplinary expertise in aut- and synecology, evolutionary biology, resource sociology, animal behavior, physiology, animal diseases and parasitology, bioenergetics, nutrition, genetics, and systems analysis and modeling. Although much of the research program is without geographic bounds, the more site-specific aspects of the program focus on Texas, Mexico, and the neotropics.

Facilities for research and graduate education include over forty laboratories with modern and sophisticated scientific instrumentation; an NSF-sponsored Center for Biosystematics and Biodiversity; the Biodiversity Research and Teaching Collections, which is among the largest collections of animals and genetic tissues in the New World; the Marine Mammal Research Facilities at Galveston; and an Aquacultural Research and Teaching Facility (laboratory and ponds) devoted to study of fish and invertebrate production for food and sport fishing. Field studies may be conducted at the Texas A&M University System’s off-campus research and extension centers. Texas A&M is a member of the Archbold Tropical Research Center on the Caribbean island of Dominica. Graduate students are eligible to apply for the usage of laboratory and field facilities at both of these locations.

Some faculty members in the Department of Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management have appointments on the intercollegiate faculties of Genetics, Ecology, Nutrition, and Toxicology; graduate students are eligible to seek degrees in those areas. The department also encourages interdisciplinary research efforts with other departments and within the Institutes of Marine Life Sciences and Renewable Natural Resources.

The Department of Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management has a residency requirement for all MS and PhD students. Master of Science students must complete, on the campus at College Station, 9 credit hours during one semester. Students who enter the doctoral degree programs with baccalaureate degrees must spend four semesters, of 9 hours each, on the campus at College Station. Students who hold master’s degrees when they enter doctoral degree programs must spend two semesters, of 9 hours each, in resident study on the campus. A semester may be fall, spring, a 10-week summer semester, or two 5-week summer terms. Full-time staff members of the University or of closely affiliated organizations stationed on the campus at College Station may fulfill residency requirements by completion of less-than-full course loads. Any exception to these rules must be approved in writing by the department head and the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

Barboza, Peregrine, Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, University of New England, 1991

Kaiser, Ronald, Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
JD, Thomas M. Cooley Law School, 1977
LLM, University of California at Berkeley, 1989

Knight, Robert, Associate Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1980

Kothmann, Merwyn, Senior Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1968

Kyle, Gerard, Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Pennsylvania State University, 2001

Lopez, Roel, Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Texas A&M University, 2001

Matarrita Cascante, David, Associate Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Pennsylvania State University, 2008

Morrison, Mike, Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Oregon State University, 1982

Muhl, Rika, Lecturer
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, Texas A&M University, 2018

Schuett, Michael, Instructional Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1991

Stronza, Amanda, Professor
Rangeland, Wildlife and Fisheries Management
PHD, University of Florida, 2000