Department of Ecology and Conservation Biology

The Department of Ecology and Conservation Biology provides one of the most advanced educational opportunities available to prepare undergraduate students for leadership in the science and stewardship of rangeland, forest and wetland ecosystems across the rural-urban gradient. We offer Bachelors of Science degrees in Ecological Restoration, Forestry, Rangeland Ecology and Management, Renewable Natural Resources, and Spatial Sciences.

Ecosystem Science and Management

ESSM 201 Exploring Ecosystem Science and Management

Credit 1. 1 Lecture Hour.

Exploration of knowledge, skills and abilities required for varied careers within ecosystem science and management; development of a professional portfolio and résumé; exploration of career options through team approach; conduct one service project.

ESSM 203 Forest Trees of North America

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Taxonomy, phylogeny, and identification of the important forest trees of North America and their ecological and social uses and benefits.
Prerequisites: BIOL 101, BIOL 107, BIOL 111 or BIOL 113 and BIOL 123 or equivalent.

ESSM 281 Seminar in Ecosystem Science and Management

Credit 1. 1 Other Hour.

Writing intensive, focused on writing and formatting technical documents relevant to ecosystem sciences and management; includes memos, short synthesis papers and one longer review paper.
Prerequisites: RENR, FORS, RLEM, ECOR and SPSA majors only.

ESSM 291 Research

Credits 0 to 4. 0 to 4 Other Hours.

Research conducted under the direction of faculty member in ecosystem science and management. May be repeated 2 times for credit.
Prerequisites: Freshman or sophomore classification and approval of instructor.

ESSM 300 Field Studies in Forest Ecosystems

Credits 3. 1 Lecture Hour. 6 Lab Hours.

Field-oriented focus on forest ecosystem science and management; problem-solve management questions through data collection and team-based research; investigate the relationships between landowner objectives, mensuration, silviculture, ecology, soils, and regeneration-focused harvesting systems; foster the development of student-faculty relationships; enhance professional knowledge and skills.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 302 Wildland Plants of North America

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Familiarization with the distribution and economic value of important wildland plants including range, forest and other natural resources in Texas and North America and fundamentals of sight identification of these plants; plant collection required.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 303 Agrostology

Credits 3. 1 Lecture Hour. 6 Lab Hours.

Classification and identification of grasses based on macro- and micromorphological variations of spikelets; interpretation of spikelet variation and use of diagnostic keys to identify important species of North America including range, forest and other natural resources; a grass collection required.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 304 Rangeland Plant Taxonomy

Credits 4. 2 Lecture Hours. 6 Lab Hours.

Interpretation of plant morphology for keying and identification of important flowering rangeland plants; vegetative and floral characters for important plant families including toxic compounds affecting domestic livestock. Plant collection required.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 306 Plant Functional Ecology and Adaptation

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Investigation of physiological mechanisms influencing ecological patterns and processes, including plant acclimation and adaptation in contrasting habitats; abiotic controls on species productivity and distribution; underlying genetic and evolutionary mechanisms contributing to the occurrence of specific genotypes and phenotypes in unique environments.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, any BIOL course, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 307 Forest Protection

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Destructive agents in forestry as related to importance, identification, cause, extent of losses and protective measures.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, or equivalent, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 308 Fundamentals of Environmental Decision-Making

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Introduction to environmental issues in natural resources management; fundamental principles and methods for understanding biosocial interdependencies in complex environmental issues; use of computer-aided group decision-making techniques to develop cooperative strategies for resolving local or global environmental issues.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 309 Forest Ecology

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Life history and general characteristics of trees; structure and function of forest ecosystems; fundamental principles of forest tree physiology and ecology applied to an analysis of tree growth in relation to environmental factors and present day forest management; global changes and forests.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 310 Forest Tree Improvement and Regeneration

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Genetic improvement or manipulation of forest trees through breeding or transformation; regeneration of forests including reproduction, nursery production, stand establishment, natural regeneration and problems affecting regeneration.
Prerequisites: BIOL 101, BIOL 113 or equivalent; junior or senior classification.

ESSM 311 Biogeochemistry and Global Change

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Framework for understanding biogeochemical cycles, their significance at both global and ecosystem levels of organization, and their contemporary relevance to ecosystem science and management.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, RENR 215, any BIOL and/or CHEM course, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 316 Range Ecology

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Organization and distribution of rangeland ecosystems of the world, with emphasis on North America; community dynamics and functions stressed including biotic history, succession, disturbance regimes, competitive interactions, herbivory, energy flow and nutrient cycling; conservation of rangeland resources.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, RENR 215, ESSM 302, and ESSM 314, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 318 Coupled Social and Ecological Systems

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Resilience-based stewardship of social-ecological systems including range, forest and other natural resources; ecological concepts of resilience, sustainability, ecosystem services and vulnerability; investigation of linkages among social and ecological system components; contribution to sustainability and provisioning of ecosystem services; evaluation of multiple knowledge sources as the basis for adaptive ecosystem management.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, AGEC 105 or equivalent, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 319 Principles of Forestry

Credits 4. 3 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Theory and practice of forestry in controlling forest establishment, composition, structure and growth; principles of natural and artificial regeneration; intermediate cultural operations; silvicultural systems; use and control of fire in forests; principles of sustainable stand management.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 320 Ecosystem Restoration and Management

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

A basic conceptual framework for restoration ecology and ecological restoration including range, forest and other natural resources; major principles of ecology related to practical problems confronting humankind, such as, environmental pollution and degradation, exotic species invasions, land use and management trade-offs and consequences; importance of biological diversity.
Prerequisite: RENR 205, RENR 215 or equivalent, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 324 Forest Measurements

Credits 2. 4 Lab Hours.

Measures and measurement of the dimensions and attributes of forested areas including the diameters, heights, volume and biomass of trees within a well-defined area; tools used for forest measurement; the conduct of forest inventories; summary measures and reports of inventory results; remote sensing and related technologies that assist forest measurements.
Prerequisites: ESSM 313 and ESSM 319 or concurrent enrollment; junior or senior classification.

ESSM 351/RENR 405 Geographic Information Systems for Resource Management

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to solving spatial problems and managing natural resources, including the acquisition, management, manipulation, analysis, and mapping of spatial and non-spatial databases; identification of natural and relevant features from various data sources; integration of relevant technologies and data; extensive use of GIS software to solve real-world problems. Only one of the following will satisfy the requirements for a degree: ESSM 351/RENR 405, RENR 405/ESSM 351, ESSM 651, BAEN 651 and RENR 651.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.
Cross Listing: RENR 405/ESSM 351.

ESSM 398 Interpretation of Aerial Photographs

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Identification and evaluation of natural and cultural features on aerial photographs; methods for extracting information concerning land use, vegetative cover, surface and structural features, urban/industrial patterns and archaeological sites.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 404 Changing Natural Resource Policy

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Process through which environmental policies are changed; study theories of social and political change; teams use theories with their original research on environmental policy problems to create and implement plans for changing environmental policies in their own communities.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 405 Forest Resource Assessment and Management

Credits 3. 1 Lecture Hour. 4 Lab Hours.

Integration of biophysical, economic and social factors in forest resource analysis, management planning and decision making; applications of interdisciplinary knowledge and multiple-use principles to practical forest management problems.
Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 416 Fire Ecology and Natural Resource Management

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Behavior and use of fire in the management of natural resources including range, forest and other natural resources; principles underlying the role of weather, fuel characteristics and physical features of the environment related to the development and implementation of fire management plans.
Prerequisite: RENR 205 or equivalent, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 417 Prescribed Fire

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Use of prescribed fire to achieve ecosystem management objectives; understanding of how to plan and implement prescribed fires; coursework on fire behavior, fuel properties and the social aspects of prescribed fire and wildfire; how to safely use fire to achieve multiple outcomes including biodiversity conservation, reduced hazardous fire risk, livestock production and timber management.
Prerequisites: ESSM 416.

ESSM 420 Ecological Restoration of Wetland and Riparian Systems

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

How wetland and riparian areas link terrestrial and aquatic systems and function hydrologically and ecologically within watersheds; integrated approaches for restoration of degraded wetland and riparian systems; improving water resources through vegetation management with a special interest in rangelands.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 430 Advanced Restoration Ecology

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

A dynamic discipline relying heavily on the fundamentals of ecology; practice translating and communicating key ecological concepts to advanced case studies in ecological restoration; enhance skills for professional applications.
Prerequisites: RENR 205, ESSM 320, ESSM 420; junior or senior classification.

ESSM 440 Wetland Delineation

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Covers the application of the 1987 Wetland Delineation Manual in use by the Army Corps of Engineers (CORPS); field indicators of hydrophytic vegetation; hydric soils, wetland hydrology, methods for making jurisdictional determinations in non-disturbed and disturbed areas, recognition of problem wetlands and technical guidelines for wetlands.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification.

ESSM 444 Remote Sensing of the Environment

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Principles and techniques necessary for applying remote sensing to diverse issues in studying and mapping land uses and land covers of the terrestrial environment; emphasizes a hands-on learning approach with theoretical foundations and applications in both aerial and satellite remote sensing, using optical and lidar datasets.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 446 Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Remote Sensing

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Fundamental components of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS), sensors and platforms, UAS operational concepts, the principles of UAS data collection, legal framework within which UAS should be operated and applied, data processing software and the generation of orthomosaics and 3D point clouds, emphasizes the use of UAS in a broad spatial sciences, technology and applications context, including vegetated ecosystems.
Prerequisites: ESSM 444 or approval of instructor; junior or senior classification.

ESSM 459 Programming for Spatial Data Applications

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Programming for spatial data applications in general and for natural resources application in particular; basic programming concepts and constructs for the creation and manipulation of spatial data; automating of processes; programming behind spreadsheet and GIS applications.
Prerequisites: ESSM 351/RENR 405 or equivalent, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 461 Spatial Databases for Data Storage, Manipulation and Analysis

Credits 3. 1 Lecture Hour. 4 Lab Hours.

Relational databases and advanced geodatabase capabilities; types of geodatabases; Structured Query Language including join-types and subqueries; ArcGIS Desktop Advanced.
Prerequisites: ESSM 459; junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 462/GEOG 462 Advanced GIS Analysis for Natural Resources Management

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Advanced topics in geographic information systems (GIS) to solve natural resource problems; manipulation of raster data types; three-dimensional modeling; emphasis on geoprocessing as it relates to applied projects particularly with habitat suitability models; field and lab use of global positioning systems (GPS); internet-based GIS modeling.
Prerequisites: ESSM 351/RENR 405 or AGSM 461 or equivalent or approval of instructor; junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: GEOG 462/ESSM 462.

ESSM 464 Spatial Project Management

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Integration of key components of spatial project management to ensure a successful project implementation using life-cycle methodology and spatial project management; strategy and planning, requirements analysis, design, development, deployment, and operations and maintenance; term project working with real world data to develop and manage a spatial project for practical applications.
Prerequisites: ESSM 351/RENR 405 and ESSM 444, junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 480 Plant Identification and Undergraduate Range Management Exam Team Competitions

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Other Hours.

Knowledge of plants morphology, identification and distribution for the profession of range management; knowledge of range management across the world; weekly tests to train on plant and range management knowledge. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

ESSM 481 Senior Seminar

Credit 1. 1 Lecture Hour.

Completion of professional e-portfolio, résumé and job application; exploration of job search, application, and interview; discipline competency exams; program evaluation.
Prerequisite: Senior classification in ESSM degree program.

ESSM 484 Internship

Credits 0 to 4. 0 to 4 Other Hours.

Supervised experience program conducted in the student's area of specialization.
Prerequisite: Approval of student's advisor.

ESSM 485 Directed Studies

Credits 0 to 3. 0 to 3 Other Hours.

Individual study and research upon a selected range problem.
Prerequisite: Approval of student's advisor.

ESSM 489 Special Topics in...

Credits 1 to 4. 1 to 4 Lecture Hours. 0 to 4 Lab Hours.

Selected topics in an identified area of rangeland ecology and management. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

ESSM 491 Research

Credits 0 to 4. 0 to 4 Other Hours.

Research conducted under the direction of faculty member in ecosystem science and management. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification and approval of instructor.

Forest Science

FRSC 420 Arboriculture

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Tree selection and planting to fit climatic, space and edaphic conditions; diagnosing tree abnormalities and practicing intensive tree care. Frequent field work and demonstrations.
Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of instructor.

FRSC 421 Urban Forestry

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Conceptual role of trees in improving the urban environment; optimum use of existing forested areas and the establishment of trees in appropriate open spaces; tree ordinances, species evaluation, street tree planning and tree inventory systems.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

Renewable Natural Resources

RENR 205 Fundamentals of Ecology

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Principles of ecology using a holistic approach treating plants, animals and humans as one integrated whole; composition, structure, nutrient cycles and energetics of biotic communities; adaptations to environmental factors; biotic relationships; and problems of environmental quality and resource use.

RENR 215 Fundamentals of Ecology--Laboratory

Credit 1. 3 Lab Hours.

Sampling and estimating plant-animal populations, measuring environmental factors and recognizing and studying morphological, physiological and behavioral adaptations of plants and animals to biotic or abiotic influences.

RENR 405/ESSM 351 Geographic Information Systems for Resource Management

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to solving spatial problems and managing natural resources, including the acquisition, management, manipulation, analysis, and mapping of spatial and non-spatial databases; identification of natural and relevant features from various data sources; integration of relevant technologies and data; extensive use of GIS software to solve real-world problems. Only one of the following will satisfy the requirements for a degree: ESSM 351/RENR 405, RENR 405/ESSM 351, ESSM 651, BAEN 651 and RENR 651.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.
Cross Listing: ESSM 351/RENR 405.

RENR 470 Environmental Impact Assessment

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

The evolution of natural resources regulatory policies and how this influences current procedures for environmental/natural resources assessment and management; demonstration of the environmental impact assessment procedures and policy issues associated with environmental impacts.
Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of instructor.

RENR 489 Special Topics in...

Credits 1 to 4. 1 to 4 Lecture Hours.

Selected topics in an identified field of renewable natural resources. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences

WFSC 101 Introduction to Wildlife and Fisheries

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Introduction to a variety of topics in the wildlife and fisheries discipline to prepare to be successful both in the field and in further studies; case studies will guide through current issues and laboratory concepts will provide hands on experience in methods and skills important in the field of wildlife and fisheries.
Prerequisite: Open only to students with less than 36 hours at Texas A&M University.

WFSC 300/ENTO 300 Field Studies

Credits 3. 3 Other Hours.

Integration of principles of animal and plant ecology with environmental factors to characterize wildlife populations; intensive analysis of specific areas will emphasize either the development of a wildlife management plan or a general vertebrate natural history survey.
Prerequisite: Prior approval of instructor and concurrent enrollment in WFSC 450/ENTO 450 and WFSC 451/ENTO 451.
Cross Listing: ENTO 300/WFSC 300.

WFSC 302 Natural History of the Vertebrates

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Introduction to life histories of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals; lecture covers vertebrate groups on a worldwide scale and emphasizes a comparative approach to the study of adaptation to the environment; lecture topics include behavior, reproduction, feeding specializations, evolutionary history, locomotion, hibernation, migration, endangered species, zoogeography and importance to man; laboratory emphasizes the recognition of Texas vertebrates. Designed for both science and non-science majors.
Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112 or BIOL 101 and BIOL 107 or equivalent.

WFSC 304 Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Ecological principles used to conserve and manage wildlife and fisheries resources at the individual, population and community levels; topics include conservation biology, species interactions, animal-habitat relationships, population dynamics and harvesting, habitat management and restoration and human dimensions of fish and wildlife conservation.
Prerequisites: RENR 205 and junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

WFSC 311 Ichthyology

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Introduction to the study of fishes, their biology, classification, evolution, distribution, ecology and economic importance.
Prerequisite: WFSC 302 or BIOL 318.

WFSC 314 Down River: Biology of Gulf Coastal Fishes

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Understanding the biological complexity of Gulf coast river systems while gaining hands-on experience in field and museum ichthyological techniques; sampling of the Guadalupe and San Antonio rivers; participation in lectures, museum preparation and archiving specimens at the Biodiversity Research and Teaching Collections (BRTC).
Prerequisites: WFSC 311 with a grade of B or better and approval of instructor.

WFSC 315 Herpetology

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 2 Lab Hours.

Evolutionary ecology of reptiles and amphibians and conservation biology of the major groups; labs concentrate on the global diversity of herps and the herpetofauna of Texas; foundation for students in wildlife science and biology.
Prerequisites: WFSC 302 or approval of instructor; WFSC 302 or BIOL 318.

WFSC 316 Field Herpetology

Credit 1. 3 Lab Hours.

Field work involving collection and preservation of herpetological specimens; natural history, ecological relations. Available for students enrolled in WFSC 315 who would like to have field trips.
Prerequisite: WFSC 315 or registration therein.

WFSC 335 Natural History of the Invertebrates

Credits 4. 3 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

A phylogenetic survey of the invertebrate phyla including their taxonomy, morphology, life histories, ecology, ethology and zoogeography. Field trips may be required for which departmental fees may be assessed to cover costs.

WFSC 401 General Mammalogy

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Mammalian biology; evolution, classification, biogeography, reproduction, physiology, ecology, and behavior; focuses on basic concepts necessary for a foundation in both wildlife science and biology.
Prerequisites: WFSC 302 or BIOL 318; junior classification.

WFSC 402 General Ornithology

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Introduction to study of birds, their structure, classification, geographic distribution, ecological relations and economic status; foundation of wildlife science, also for museum work.
Prerequisites: WFSC 302 or BIOL 318; junior classification.

WFSC 403 Animal Ecology

Credits 3. 2 Lecture Hours. 3 Lab Hours.

Concepts of animal ecology which emerge at various levels of organization; the ecosystem, the community, the population and the individual; laboratories emphasis on the quantitative analysis of field data and the simulation of population dynamics.
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in RENR 205 or approval of instructor; junior classification.

WFSC 415/MARB 415 Coastal Marine Biology and Geology of Alaska

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Field course conducted in south-central Alaska for two weeks; work at the remote Alice Cove Research Station located in Prince William Sound; conduct research on marine mammals behavior and ecology; exploration of the geology and glaciology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 112.
Cross Listing: MARB 415/WFSC 415.

WFSC 422 Ethology

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Survey of the control, ontogeny, function and natural selection of behavior in a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species; interaction between the organism and its environment with regard to the mechanisms and adaptive significance of behavior; evolution of anti-predator, feeding, reproductive and cooperative traits.
Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent.

WFSC 425 Marine Fisheries

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Survey of fisheries for marine vertebrates and invertebrates primarily in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic with special emphasis being directed to their biology, economics and management.

WFSC 433 Molecular Ecology in Wildlife and Fisheries

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Fundamentals of molecular ecology applied to conservation and management of wildlife and fisheries; presentation and discussion of scientific papers on wildlife and fisheries molecular ecology; topics in conservation, management and aquaculture.
Prerequisites: BIOL 112 or equivalent; junior or senior classification.

WFSC 448 Fish Ecophysiology

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

Ecological domains and demands placed on physiological performance; physiological mechanisms and control in fishes, interaction of physiological mechanisms with environment, emphasis in adaptive value of physiological traits; analysis of physiology and adaptation with models; process and functional modeling.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification or approval of instructor.

WFSC 450/ENTO 450 Caribbean Conservation

Credits 2. 6 Lab Hours.

Provide experience in and appreciation for diverse tropical habitats and the problems associated with conserving these habitats; design and conduct individual research projects on topics of their choice with approval from the instructors on project design and feasibility.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in ENTO 300/WFSC 300 and ENTO 451/WFSC 451; junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: ENTO 450/WFSC 450.

WFSC 451/ENTO 451 Caribbean Research Seminar

Credit 1. 1 Other Hour.

Document research activities; keep a journal of activities and research methods during study abroad trips.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in ENTO 300/WFSC 300 and ENTO 450/WFSC 450; junior or senior classification.
Cross Listing: ENTO 451/WFSC 451.

WFSC 462/BIOL 462 Amazon River Tropical Biology

Credits 3. 3 Lecture Hours.

History, ecology, evolutionary-biology, geography and culture of the Amazon River and Rio Negro; exploration of the world’s most bio-diverse river during a 10-day expedition from Manaus, Brazil; survey biota, record observations about the ecosystem, select research topics, development of presentations.
Prerequisites: BIOL 107, BIOL 112, BIOL 113, BIOL 357 or RENR 205; or approval of instructor.
Cross Listing: BIOL 462/WFSC 462.

Barboza, Peregrine, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of New England, 1991

Boutton, Thomas, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Brigham Young University, 1979

Briske, David, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Colorado State University, 1978

Casola, Claudio, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Pisa, Italy, 2006

Conway, Kevin, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, San Louis University, 2010

Dewitt, Thomas, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, State University of New York - Binghamton, 1996

Dronen, Norman, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, New Mexico State University, 1974

Eriksson, Marian, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Minnesota, 1989

Feagin, Russell, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Texas A&M University, 2003

Fitzgerald, Lee, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of New Mexico, 1993

Fujiwara, Masami, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Massachusetts Inst of Technology, 2002

Gan, Jianbang, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Iowa State University, 1990

Gatlin, Delbert, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Mississippi State University, 1983

Grace, Jacquelyn, Assistant Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Wake Forest University, 2014

Grant, William, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Colorado State University, 1974

Hibbitts, Toby, Lecturer
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of the Witwatersrand, 2006

Hurtado Clavijo, Luis, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Rutgers, 2002

Hyodo, Ayumi, Research Assistant Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, The University of Western Ontario, 2010

Kreuter, Urs, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Utah State University, 1992

Lacher, Thomas, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Pittsburgh, 1980

Lawing, Anna, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Indiana University, 2012

Light, Jessica, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Louisiana State University, 2005

Loopstra, Carol, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, North Carolina State University, 1992

Mateos, Mariana, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Rutgers, 2002

Moore, Georgianne, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Oregon State University, 2004

Mora-Zacarias, Miguel, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of California, Davis, 1990

Noormets, Asko, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Michigan Technological University, 2001

Osorio Leyton, Javier, Visiting Lecturer
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2012

Perkin, Joshuah, Assistant Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Kansas State University, 2012

Popescu, Sorin, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Virginia Tech, 2002

Rogers, William, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Kansas State University, 1998

Smeins, Fred, Visiting Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Saskatchewan, 1967

Spalink, Daniel, Assistant Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015

Srinivasan, Raghavan, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Purdue University, 1992

Struminger, Rhonda, Assistant Professor of the Practice
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Texas A&M University, 2013

Veldman, Joseph, Assistant Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Florida, 2010

Voelker, Gary, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Washington, 1998

Watson, Wesley, Lecturer
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1999

West, Jason, Associate Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Georgia, 2002

Wilcox, Bradford, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, Texas A&M University, 1986

Winemiller, Kirk, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Texas, 1987

Wu, Xinyuan, Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1991

Yorzinski, Jessica, Assistant Professor
Ecology and Conservation Biology
PHD, University of California Davis, 2012